The Kalaureia Excavation Project

Opuscula 14 is published with open access. Printed edition distributed by Eddy.se AB. Also available at Amazon.com, Adlibris, and Bokus. View volume at ERIH PLUS. The Kalaureia Excavation Project. A preliminary report of the work carried out in Area L between 2015 and 2018 By Anton Bonnier (Uppsala University, Sweden), Therese Emanuelsson-Paulson (Stockholm University, Sweden), Dimitra Mylona (INSTAP Study Center for East Crete, Greece) & Arto Penttinen (Swedish Institute at Athens, Greece) Abstract The report presents a summary and preliminary discussion on the work carried out by the Swedish Institute at ancient Kalaureia between 2015 and 2018 in Area L. The excavations were focused on this area with the hopes of gaining a better understanding of the settlement which was situated south of the Sanctuary of Poseidon in antiquity. The excavations show that a large building was constructed probably around the middle of the 4th century BC in the western part of Area L. The full outline and functional use of the building has not yet been fully established but the building seems to have been in use in several subsequent phases. The excavated remains further suggest that dining activities were carried out in the southern part of the building….

Agios Elias of Asea, Arcadia. Volume 1

Distributed by Eddy.se AB. Also available at Amazon.com, Adlibris, and Bokus. Agios Elias of Asea, Arcadia. From early sanctuary to medieval village. Volume 1 Edited by Jeannette Forsén A brief four-week excavation campaign in 1997 at the temple on top of the mountain of Agios Elias at Asea produced abundant archaeological material which partly is presented in this study, along with a stratigraphic report of part of the excavated area. The pottery, miniature vessels, miscellaneous terracotta finds, roof tiles, faunal and human bones, glass, coins, sculpture and miscellaneous stone objects are included in the present work. The first focus of activities at the site took place around c. 720–690 BC (Early Protocorinthian). No architecture was found in connection with this period. However, roof tiles of a temple and some auxiliary buildings from c. 590–560 BC (Middle Corinthian–Late Corinthian I) are accompanied by a large amount of pottery which point at a second floruit of the site during this period. Some of the pottery is local/regional, with other examples originating from many parts of southern Greece in addition to Attica and possibly East Greece as well. During the 14th century AD a village, named Kandreva, and church existed where the ancient…

Erik Wetter and the genesis of the San Giovenale excavations

All content of Opuscula 13 is available with open access. Printed edition distributed by Eddy.se AB. Also available at Amazon.com, Adlibris, and Bokus. View volume at ERIH PLUS. Erik Wetter and the genesis of the San Giovenale excavations By Fredrik Tobin-Dodd (Swedish Institute of Classical Studies in Rome, Italy) Abstract The Swedish excavations at San Giovenale (1956–1965) had a major impact in the field of pre-Roman archaeology in Italy, primarily through the discovery of remains of both Etruscan and earlier domestic architecture. This article examines the genesis of the project, and suggests that the early history of the project has sometimes been misrepresented. While the excavations came to serve as a training-ground for young Swedish archaeologists and made very important contributions to the study of ancient domestic architecture, these were not explicit goals at the conception of the project. The article also studies the peculiar role of Admiral Erik Wetter in the San Giovenale excavations. Despite not being an archaeologist himself, Wetter was both the instigator and, in many ways, the driving force behind the project. The result was an unusual and unclear leadership situation, something that in the long run created problems for the project. Bibliographical information Fredrik Tobin-Dodd,…

Religion and family politics in Hellenistic Kalaureia

All content of Opuscula 13 is available with open access. Printed edition distributed by Eddy.se AB. Also available at Amazon.com, Adlibris, and Bokus. View volume at ERIH PLUS. Religion and family politics in Hellenistic Kalaureia. Three new inscriptions from the sanctuary of Poseidon By Nikolaos Papazarkadas (University of California, Berkeley, USA) & Jenny Wallensten (Swedish Institute at Athens, Greece) Abstract This article presents three unpublished Hellenistic inscriptions from the sanctuary of Poseidon in Kalaureia (modern Poros): two found during archaeological excavations on the site and one recorded in a letter that was once part of Ioannis Kapodistrias’ official correspondence. All three inscriptions were dedicatory and carved on bases supporting portrait statues. Interestingly, they were offered to Poseidon by members of a single family already known from other documents in the Kalaureian epigraphic corpus. Remarkably, eight out of the 18 inscriptions discovered in Kalaureia make repeated references to men and women of this very family, which appears to have materially dominated Poseidon’s temenos and its environs during the 3rd and 2nd centuries BC through the careful placement of portraits of its members. Most of these statues were conspicuously placed by the entrance to the sanctuary, though at least one of them…

A Protocorinthian aryballos with a myth scene from Tegea

All content of Opuscula 13 is available with open access. Printed edition distributed by Eddy.se AB. Also available at Amazon.com, Adlibris, and Bokus. View volume at ERIH PLUS. A Protocorinthian aryballos with a myth scene from Tegea By Erik Østby (University of Bergen, Norway) Abstract During the preparation of the new exhibition in the Museum of Tegea it was discovered that one composed fragment from a Protocorinthian aryballos with a complicated, figured representation, found during the excavations of the Norwegian Institute at Athens in the Sanctuary of Athena Alea in the 1990s, joined with another fragment found by the French excavation at the same site in the early 20th century. After the join, the interpretation of the scene must be completely changed. The aryballos has two narrative scenes in a decorative frieze: a fight between two unidentified men over a large vessel, and an unidentified myth involving the killing of a horse-like monster by two heroes, with the probable presence of Athena. Possibly this is an otherwise unknown episode from the cycle of the Argonauts, involving the Dioskouroi, perhaps also Jason and Medea. The aryballos was produced by an artist closely related to and slightly earlier than the so-called Huntsmen…

A Mycenaean pictorial vase from Midea

All content of Opuscula 13 is available with open access. Printed edition distributed by Eddy.se AB. Also available at Amazon.com, Adlibris, and Bokus. View volume at ERIH PLUS. A Mycenaean pictorial vase from Midea By Katie Demakopoulou (Director Emerita, National Archaeological Museum, Athens, Greece) Abstract The Greek-Swedish excavations on the Mycenaean acropolis of Midea have brought to light a large amount of fine decorated pottery, which includes numerous fragmentary vases and sherds with pictorial decoration. This material has firmly established Midea as an important find-spot of figure-style pottery, like other great Mycenaean Argive centres, such as Mycenae, Tiryns and Berbati. This paper presents a remarkable pictorial vase recently found at Midea. It is a ring-based krater, almost completely restored from fragments, decorated with a row of six birds. The bird is a common motif in Mycenaean pictorial vase painting and also well attested on many other ceramic pieces at Midea, particularly the type of the folded-wing marsh bird. This type of bird is also popular at Tiryns, providing evidence that this category of pictorial pottery from the two citadels, dated to the LH IIIB2 period, was produced in the same workshop, which must have been situated at or near Tiryns….

The New Swedish Cyprus Expedition 2019

All content of Opuscula 13 is available with open access. Printed edition distributed by Eddy.se AB. Also available at Amazon.com, Adlibris, and Bokus. View volume at ERIH PLUS. The New Swedish Cyprus Expedition 2019: Excavations at Hala Sultan Tekke (The Söderberg Expedition). Preliminary results, with contributions by L. Recht, B. Placiente Robedizo, C. Eriksson, L. Andersson, M. Svensson, L. Avial Chicharro, S. Hermon, M. Polig & D. Kofel By Peter M. Fischer (University of Gothenburg, Sweden) & Teresa Bürge (Austrian Academy of Sciences) Abstract The tenth season of excavations at the Late Bronze Age city of Hala Sultan Tekke was carried out in four areas: City Quarter 1 (CQ1), CQ4, City Wall 1 (CW1), and Area A (Tomb RR). The excavations in CQ1 provided additional information on the pre-LC IIIA occupation of the city. Stratum 3 which can be dated to the LC IIC (13th century BC) was further exposed. For the first time in the city even older phases, Strata 4 and 5, were found. These are tentatively dated to the LC I–II (15th to 14th century BC). In CQ4 numerous storage areas were exposed, which belong to a large compound. There is also evidence of production of textiles…

The 2016–2018 Greek-Swedish archaeological project at Thessalian Vlochos, Greece

All content of Opuscula 13 is available with open access. Printed edition distributed by Eddy.se AB. Also available at Amazon.com, Adlibris, and Bokus. View volume at ERIH PLUS. The 2016–2018 Greek-Swedish archaeological project at Thessalian Vlochos, Greece By Maria Vaïopoulou (Ephorate of Antiquities of Karditsa, Greece), Helene Whittaker (University of Gothenburg, Sweden), Robin Rönnlund (University of Gothenburg, Sweden), Fotini Tsiouka (Ephorate of Antiquities of Karditsa, Greece), Johan Klange (Arkeologikonsult Ltd., Sweden), Derek Pitman (Bournemouth University, United Kingdom), Rich Potter (University of Gothenburg, Sweden), Lawrence Shaw (University of Winchester, United Kingdom), Josephine Hagan (Bournemouth University, United Kingdom), Ellen Siljedahl (University of Gothenburg, Sweden), Matilda Forssén (University of Gothenburg, Sweden), Sujatha Chandrasekaran (University of Gothenburg, Sweden), Sotiria Dandou (Swedish Institute at Athens, Greece), Veronica Forsblom Ljungdahl (National Museums of History, Sweden), Asta Pavilionytė (Bournemouth University, United Kingdom), Hayden Scott-Pratt (Bournemouth University, United Kingdom), Elisabet Schager (National Museums of History, Sweden) & Harry Manley (Bournemouth University, United Kingdom) Abstract The Vlochos Archaeological Project (2016–2018) was a Greek-Swedish archaeological investigation of the remains of the ancient urban site at Vlochos in western Thessaly, Greece. Employing a wide array of non-invasive methods, the project succeeded in completely mapping the visible remains, which had previously not…

Greece and the Levant in the 10th–9th centuries BC

All content of Opuscula 12 (2019) is available with open access. Printed edition distributed by Eddy.se AB. Also available at Amazon.com, Adlibris, and Bokus. View volume at ERIH PLUS. Greece and the Levant in the 10th–9th centuries BC. A view from Tel Rehov By Amihai Mazar (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel) & Nota Kourou (University of Athens, Greece) Abstract Tel Rehov in the Beth Shean Valley, northern Israel, yielded 14 Greek (mainly Euboean and Attic) pottery sherds from the Late Protogeometric to Middle Geometric periods. This is the largest number of Greek sherds from these periods found at a single site in the Southern Levant in stratigraphic contexts. Since the Tel Rehov strata, well-dated by a large number of 14C dates, yielded some of the richest assemblages of finds from the 10–9th centuries BC in this region, the Greek sherds provide an opportunity to examine both their absolute dating in context and to discuss the nature of the relations between the two regions. Six of the 14 sherds were published previously (Coldstream & Mazar 2003); in the present paper, we describe the finds from Tel Rehov and other sites in the Southern Levant according to five chronological divisions, update…

Palaepaphos-Skales Tomb 277. More prestigious burials

All content of Opuscula 12 (2019) is available with open access. Printed edition distributed by Eddy.se AB. Also available at Amazon.com, Adlibris, and Bokus. View volume at ERIH PLUS. Palaepaphos-Skales Tomb 277. More prestigious burials. With an appendix by Maria A. Socratous By Vassos Karageorghis (The Cyprus Institute, Cyprus) & Efstathios Raptou (Cyprus Museum, Cyprus) Abstract Tomb 277 in the Skales cemetery at Palaepaphos, excavated by the Cyprus Department of Antiquities, is among the richest ever found in the south-west of the island. It dates to the Cypro-Geometric III period (c. 900–750 BC) and was used for multiple burials of important members of the Palaepaphian society, namely warriors and important women (priestesses of the Great Goddess?) judging from the abundant offerings of arms and armour as well as gold jewellery respectively (including gold plaques embossed with the head of the Egyptian goddess Hathor). Notable among the offerings are two bronze basins, six small hemispherical bronze bowls, two bronze mace-heads (symbols of authority), a bronze shield of a rare type, and two richly decorated belts of oriental type. We also mention two iron swords and a bronze spearhead. Among the pottery we note the high percentage of Phoenician imports. Both inhumations…