Agios Elias of Asea, Arcadia. Volume 1

Distributed by Eddy.se AB. Also available at Amazon.com, Adlibris, and Bokus. Agios Elias of Asea, Arcadia. From early sanctuary to medieval village. Volume 1 Edited by Jeannette Forsén A brief four-week excavation campaign in 1997 at the temple on top of the mountain of Agios Elias at Asea produced abundant archaeological material which partly is presented in this study, along with a stratigraphic report of part of the excavated area. The pottery, miniature vessels, miscellaneous terracotta finds, roof tiles, faunal and human bones, glass, coins, sculpture and miscellaneous stone objects are included in the present work. The first focus of activities at the site took place around c. 720–690 BC (Early Protocorinthian). No architecture was found in connection with this period. However, roof tiles of a temple and some auxiliary buildings from c. 590–560 BC (Middle Corinthian–Late Corinthian I) are accompanied by a large amount of pottery which point at a second floruit of the site during this period. Some of the pottery is local/regional, with other examples originating from many parts of southern Greece in addition to Attica and possibly East Greece as well. During the 14th century AD a village, named Kandreva, and church existed where the ancient…

Inscriptions et timbres céramiques de Rhodes
ActaAth-4° , Catalogue / 2017-10-18

Now available for purchase at Amazon.com, Bokus.com, and Adlibris.com. Distributed by eddy.se at Bokorder.se. Inscriptions et timbres céramiques de Rhodes. Documents recueillis par le médecin et explorateur suédois Johan Hedenborg (1786-1865) By Nathan Badoud Johan Hedenborg (1786–1865) was a medical doctor whose curiosity gave him a wide interest in natural and social science. In 1825, he was attached to the embassy of Sweden and Norway to the Sublime Porte. After exploring the Aegean and both sides of the Red Sea for fifteen years, he settled in Rhodes with the aim of writing a history of the island. The manuscript, completed in 1857, was never published. It contains copies of 303 inscriptions on stone, 54 of them otherwise unknown, and drawings of more than 150 stamped amphora handles and tiles. All these documents are studied here. Bibliographical information Nathan Badoud, Inscriptions et timbres céramiques de Rhodes. Documents recueillis par le médecin et explorateur suédois Johan Hedenborg (1786-1865) (Skrifter utgivna av Svenska Institutet i Athen, 4°, 57), Stockholm 2017. ISBN: 978-91-791606-5-4. Hard cover, 145 pages. Reviews Anzeiger für die Altertumswissenschaft 70, 2017, 6-8 (C. Barker) Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2018.08.02 (Lucia Criscuolo) The Classical Review 69:2, 2019, 664–666 (Nicholas K. Rauh) Dialogues…

Mycenaeans up to date

Now available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com, and Bokorder.se Mycenaeans up to date. The archaeology of the northeastern Peloponnese—current concepts and new directions By Ann-Louise Schallin & Iphiyenia Tournavitou (eds.) This volume contains the proceedings of the conference Mycenaeans up to date: The archaeology of the north-eastern Peloponnese—current concepts and new directions, which was held 10–16 November 2010, under the auspices of the Swedish Institute at Athens. The published papers reveal the latest news in the field of Mycenaean archaeology in the Argolid and the surrounding areas. Ongoing fieldwork, as well as new interpretations of the extant archaeological material is presented and discussed in detail. The first part of the volume consists of papers dealing with new, unpublished evidence regarding many of the well-known Argive sites, including Mycenae, Tiryns, Argos, Midea, and the Nemea Valley, among others. The second part is devoted to in-depth studies on a number of major themes, such as Mycenaean architecture, administration, mortuary practices and religion. Contents Ann-Louise Schallin & Iphiyenia Tournavitou | Introduction The Argolid Mycenae Elizabeth French | Tending the past, ensuring the future Kim Shelton | Pottery and Petsas House: Recent research on LH IIIA2 Mycenae Iphiyenia Tournavitou | The East…

Bones, behaviour and belief

Now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com and Adlibris.com. Bones, behaviour and belief. The zooarchaeological evidence as a source for ritual practice in ancient Greece and beyond Edited by Gunnel Ekroth & Jenny Wallensten https://doi.org/10.30549/actaath-4-55 The importance of the zooarchaeological evidence as a source for ritual practices in ancient Greece is gradually becoming widely recognized. Animal bones form the only category of evidence for Greek cult which is constantly significantly increasing, and they can complement and elucidate the information provided by texts, inscriptions and images. This volume brings together sixteen contributions exploring ritual practices and animal bones from different chronological and geographical perspectives, foremost ancient Greece in the historical period, but also in the Bronze Age and as early as the Neolithic period, as well as Anatolia, France and Scandinavia, providing new empirical evidence from a number of major sanctuaries and cult-places. On a methodological level, the complexity of identifying ritual activity from the zooarchaeological evidence is a recurrent theme, as is the prominence of local variation visible in the bone material, suggesting that the written sources and iconography may offer simplified or idealized versions of the rituals actually performed. Although zooarchaeology…

Mastos in the Berbati Valley

Open access, use links below. Printed edition distributed by Eddy.se AB. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, and Adlibris.com. Mastos in the Berbati Valley. An intensive archaeological survey By Michael Lindblom & Berit Wells (eds.) This study presents the results of a small but intensive surface survey conducted on the Mastos Hill in the Berbati Valley in 1999. While remains from the Early and Late Helladic period were known from previous excavations on its southern and eastern slopes, this is the first analysis of the entire hill. It includes a digital documentation of the local topography as well as an account of the archaeological remains retrieved in the field. The study fills a gap in different data sets and results gained through old excavations and the extensive 1988–1990 Berbati-Limnes survey. The introductory chapter summarizes previous work in the valley, discusses its ancient routes of communication and outlines the method employed in the archaeological survey. This is followed by an account of the topographical survey and the geographical information system used. In the six following chapters the archaeological remains are presented and analyzed in a diachronic fashion. It is concluded that the hill was predominantely settled in prehistory with the exception…

Children lost and found

Open access, use link below. Printed edition available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com. Distributed by Eddy.se AB. Asine 3. Supplementary studies in the Swedish excavations 1922–1930. Fasc. 2. Children lost and found. A bioarchaeological study of Middle Helladic children in Asine with a comparison to Lerna By Anne Ingvarsson-Sundström This study focuses on children’s living conditions during the Middle Helladic period in Greece. The primary material comprises disarticulated skeletal remains found in a stratigraphic context during the Swedish excavations of Asine in 1926: 4,583 fragments/complete bones. These made up 103 subadults and 36 adults by means of Minimum Number of Individual (MNI) calculations. It was possible to assign subadult skeletal remains to 39 of the 105 already published graves in the Lower Town of Asine. In addition, children’s graves and skeletal remains from the neighbouring site of Lerna (periods IV–VI) are considered for comparisons of demography, health and mortuary treatment. The wider archaeological context, i.e., the published mortuary material from the settlements and cemeteries, is also examined and used to describe the community’s perception of children. It is necessary to consider children in past cultures as active and constantly changing individuals, possessing different social roles during the course…

Pyrgouthi

Distributed by Astrom Editions. View record at WorldCat. Pyrgouthi. A rural site in the Berbati Valley from the Early Iron Age to Late Antiquity. Excavations by the Swedish Institute at Athens 1995 and 1997 By Jenni Hjohlman, Arto Penttinen & Berit Wells, with contributions by Yannis Bassiakos, Katie Theodorakopoulou, Hero Granger-Taylor, Sven Isaksson, Petros Lymberakis, Dimitra Mylona, Maria Ntinou, Anaya Sarpaki & George Syrides This volume presents the results of the excavations in 1995 and 1997 at Pyrgouthi in the Berbati Valley, Argolis, Greece. The toponym is the local denomination for a Hellenistic tower, which has always been a prominent in the landscape. In the surface survey of the valley in 1988–1990 the tower was perceived as part of a Classical farmstead and in the ensuing excavation project it was targeted as such. However, the excavations revealed that this interpretation corresponded to but a fraction of the truth. The tower had been built on a knoll in the center of the valley but the earliest human activities at the site can be dated to the end of the Early Iron Age or the eight century BC. At this point in time, Arto Penttinen argues, the archaeological record can be reconciled…

The Asea Valley Survey

Distributed by Astrom Editions. See record at WorldCat. The Asea Valley Survey. An Arcadian mountain valley from the Paleolithic period until modern times By Jeannette Forsén & Björn Forsén, with contributions by Michael Alram, Eva Alram-Stern, Tristan Carter, Fredrik Fahlander, Rune Frederiksen, Leslie Hammond, Arja Karivieri, Mika Lavento, Camilla MacKay, Jari Pakkanen, Ann-Louise Schallin, Kim S. Shelton, Eos Tsourti & Wendy Yielding This volume presents the finds of the Asea Valley Survey (AVS) carried out 1994–1996 in a mountain valley of Arcadia with the acropolis of Asea, the Palaeokastro, as its focal point. During these three seasons of archaeological surface survey 18.7 km2 of the valley were searched intensively in foot. Artefacts spanning from the Middle Palaeolithic period to the early 19th century were systematically collected and documented. Concurrently a geological team gathered data concerning the ever-changing landscape of the valley. By combining new archaeological and geological data with ancient, Byzantine, Ottoman and Venetian written sources the diachronic history of the Asea valley was reconstructed. Through the discovery of a Middle–Upper Palaeolithic site the regional history has been pushed back to about 50,000 BP. Furthermore, a handful of Early–Middle Neolithic lakeside sites, which produced nothing but chipped stone, may be…

Swedish excavations at Sinda, Cyprus
ActaAth-4° / 2003-01-01

Published by the Swedish Institute at Athens. Distributed by Astrom Editions. Swedish excavations at Sinda, Cyprus. Excavations conducted by Arne Furumark 1947–1948 Arne Furumark & Charles M. Adelman, with contributions by Paul Åström, Nils-Gustaf Gejwall & Hans Henning von der Osten When Arne Furumark was entrusted with writing the Late Bronze Age summary volume for the Swedish Cyprus Expedition, he realized that a habitation site was needed in order to clarify problems associated with the last phases of that period. As neither the French nor the Cypriot excavations at Enkomi had yet been published he decided to find his own site: he scouted several, but settled on Sinda because recent illicit digging there had thrown up sherds of a sort never before seen on the island, namely Mycenaean IIIC1b. He conducted two short excavation seasons but the control excavation he planned was aborted when he received notice from Cypriote authorities that there was large scale destruction of the site. Although there is evidence of earlier and later habitation at Sinda, the most important is the Late Bronze Age fortified town (probably built along the copper trading route), with its three phases: Sinda I, II and III. Sinda I, which saw…

The function of the “Minoan villa”

Published by the Swedish Institute at Athens. Distributed by Astrom Editions The function of the “Minoan villa”. Proceedings of the Eight International Symposium at the Swedish Institute at Athens, 6–8 June, 1992 Edited by Robin Hägg These twenty papers, presented at an international conference in Athens, deal with various aspects of the so-called villas in Neopalatial Crete and their possible predecessors or equivalents in the preceding, Protopalatial period. They are followed by transcripts of the discussions of the symposium. Among the problems treated are: the origin of the “villa system”, the definition of the “villa”, the architectural analysis of buildings and building complexes, the magico-religious background of the “villa”, the role of religious painting, the origin of the Cretan andreion, and a study of ceramic exchange between towns and outlying settlements in Neopalatial eastern Crete. Special discussions concern the functional analysis of the architecture, administration and bureaucracy, with special reference to seals, sealings and Linear A tablets and political geography. Contents ‘Preface’, 7 Henri van Effenterre & Micheline van Effenterre, ‘Towards a study of Neopalatial “villas”: modern words for Minoan things’, 9–13 Wolf-Dietrich Niemeier, ‘The origins of the Minoan “villa” system’, 15–19 J.A. MacGillivray, ‘The Cretan countryside in the Old…