Cooking stands and braziers in Greek sanctuaries

2014-12-02

Front cover of Opuscula. Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome (OpAthRom) 7, Stockholm 2014. ISSN: 2000-0898. ISBN: 978-91-977798-6-9. Softcover, 257 pages.Opuscula 7 is now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com and Adlibris.com.

Cooking stands and braziers in Greek sanctuaries

By Charlotte Scheffer

Abstract

The presence of dining-rooms in Greek sanctuaries shows that food was eaten and most likely also cooked on the premises. The study of both the preparation and the cooking of the food eaten in the sanctuaries would be too much, and this paper will therefore concentrate on the presence of cooking stands and braziers in Greek sanctuaries, their uses, and on other related means of carrying the pots. Cooking stands were meant to hold the cooking pots above the fire; they were open at the bottom and were placed in the fire or perhaps rather in the glowing embers of a fire. In Etruria, there were three types (types I–III): a cylindrical stand with a top plate with holes, a half-cylindrical stand with three supports attached to the inner side of the wall, and a barrel-like stand with a narrower top. Cooking braziers had, unlike the cooking stands, a closed bottom as well as the means to carry a pot.

Bibliographical information

Charlotte Scheffer, ‘Cooking stands and braziers in Greek sanctuaries’, Opuscula. Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome (OpAthRom) 7, Stockholm 2014, 175–183. ISSN: 2000-0898. ISBN: 978-91-977798-6-9. Softcover, 257 pages. http://doi.org/10.30549/opathrom-07-09

See also

Conference: Berit Wells in memoriam

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