Carthage II

Now available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com and Bokorder.se Carthage II. The Swedish Mission to Carthage. Part of the UNESCO Project “Pour Sauver Carthage” By John Lund, Rita Larje and Harald Nilsson, with contributions by Maria Vretemark. Foreword by Kristian Göransson and epilogue by Birgitta Sander This second and final volume on the Swedish participation in the UNESCO project “Pour Sauver Carthage” 1979–1983 presents three detailed studies of excavated material from the Swedish main Site A at Carthage: terracotta lamps, animal bones and coins. The site is situated in central Carthage on the highest point of the saddle between the Carthaginian heights Byrsa and Juno. Excavations unearthed somewhat unexpectedly a building complex with a small Roman and Late Antique bath. Approximately 7000 finds were registered, and of them only the three categories presented in this volume have been analyzed in their entirety. They show that the latest building complex was used through to the 7th century AD. Circa 893 (mainly fragments of) terracotta lamps found at Site A are published and analytically studied in Chapter 1. A large amount of bones from mammals, birds and fish are studied and analysed in Chapter 2. The catalogue of the coinage…

Bones, behaviour and belief

Now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com and Adlibris.com. Bones, behaviour and belief. The zooarchaeological evidence as a source for ritual practice in ancient Greece and beyond By Gunnel Ekroth & Jenny Wallensten (eds.) The importance of the zooarchaeological evidence as a source for ritual practices in ancient Greece is gradually becoming widely recognized. Animal bones form the only category of evidence for Greek cult which is constantly significantly increasing, and they can complement and elucidate the information provided by texts, inscriptions and images. This volume brings together sixteen contributions exploring ritual practices and animal bones from different chronological and geographical perspectives, foremost ancient Greece in the historical period, but also in the Bronze Age and as early as the Neolithic period, as well as Anatolia, France and Scandinavia, providing new empirical evidence from a number of major sanctuaries and cult-places. On a methodological level, the complexity of identifying ritual activity from the zooarchaeological evidence is a recurrent theme, as is the prominence of local variation visible in the bone material, suggesting that the written sources and iconography may offer simplified or idealized versions of the rituals actually performed. Although zooarchaeology needs…

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