The New Swedish Cyprus Expedition 2018

Opuscula 12 (2019) is available for purchase at Amazon.com, Adlibris, and Bokus. Distributed by eddy.se ab at bokorder.se. The New Swedish Cyprus Expedition 2018: Excavations at Hala Sultan Tekke (The Söderberg Expedition). Preliminary results, with contributions by J. Tracz and D. Kofel By Peter M. Fischer & Teresa Bürge Abstract During the ninth field season at the Late Bronze Age city of Hala Sultan Tekke, excavations in City Quarter 1 (CQ1) continued and brought to light industrial and domestic structures belonging to three phases of occupation (Strata 3–1) dating to the 13th and 12th centuries BC (LC IIC–IIIA). Finds of more than half a ton of copper slag together with remains of furnaces and tuyères indicate intensive urban copper production. There is also evidence of textile production in CQ1. A magnetometer survey of roughly 23 ha resulted in the discovery of another large city quarter (CQ4) between CQ1 and Area A (the cemetery) with regularly arranged stone-built compounds of imposing dimensions intersected by streets. Several massive walls are faced with ashlar slabs which distinguishes this quarter from the industrial and domestic CQ1–3. A bathroom built of ashlar blocks with an advanced hydrological layout was exposed in CQ4 (Stratum 1, LC…

The Swedish Jordan Expedition 2013

Opuscula 7 is now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com and Adlibris.com. The Swedish Jordan Expedition 2013 at Tall Abu al-Kharaz. Preliminary results from Areas 9, 10 and 11 By Peter M. Fischer & Teresa Bürge Abstract The Swedish excavations at Tall Abu al-Kharaz, a twelve-hectare tell in the central Jordan Valley, continued in 2013 in order to shed further light on the Iron Age occupation of this city that was first settled around 3200 BC, corresponding to the conventional Early Bronze Age IB. The Iron Age occupation lasted from the 12th century BC until 732 BC, when the city was conquered by the Neo-Assyrians. From 2009 to 2012, excavations in Area 9 revealed an exceptionally well-preserved two-storey compound dating from Iron Age I (local Phase IX), i.e. around 1100 BC. The stone compound was exposed for a length of 46 m. It consists of 21 rooms, with walls still standing to a height of more than 2 m. Several hundred complete vessels and other objects point to the extensive contacts of a fairly rich society. Contacts with the Aegean and Cyprus, through offshoots of the Sea Peoples/Philistines, and with Egypt and…

Reconsidering the tomb of Aulus Hirtius
Article , Content / 2008-12-02

Opuscula 1 (2008) is out of print. Available for free download at Bokorder.se. Used copies might be available at Amazon.com and Amazon.de. Reconsidering the tomb of Aulus Hirtius By Henrik Gerding Abstract Since its discovery, the tomb of Aulus Hirtius in Rome has been regarded as a firmly dated monument and, thus, constituted a widely used fixed point for those tracing the early development of Roman brick architecture. However, several peculiarities regarding the construction of the tomb and its inscriptions strongly indicate that the present dating, which is based on historical sources, may not be correct. In this note it is suggested by the author that the original tomb was destroyed and thoroughly remodelled in the early or mid-Augustan period. Some general implications of this regarding the introduction of brick architecture in Rome are also considered. Bibliographical information Henrik Gerding, ‘Reconsidering the tomb of Aulus Hirtius’, Opuscula. Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome (OpAthRom) 1, 145–154. Stockholm 2008. ISSN: 2000-0898. ISBN: 978-91-977798-0-7. Softcover, 198 pages. http://doi.org/10.30549/opathrom-01-11

A forgotten tomb at Hippokome and its neighbours
Article , Content / 2008-12-02

Opuscula 1 (2008) is out of print. Available for free download at Bokorder.se. Used copies might be available at Amazon.com and Amazon.de. A forgotten tomb at Hippokome and its neighbours By Paavo Roos Abstract A rock-cut tomb in Hippokome on the Lyco-Carian border was overlooked in an earlier survey and is published here, together with an adjacent blind door and two niches with sockets for stelai beside it, and another tomb and a niche in the vicinity. Bibliographical information Paavo Roos, ‘A forgotten tomb at Hippokome and its neighbours’, Opuscula. Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome (OpAthRom) 1, 137–144. Stockholm 2008. ISSN: 2000-0898. ISBN: 978-91-977798-0-7. Softcover, 198 pages. http://doi.org/10.30549/opathrom-01-10

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