Mastos in the Berbati Valley

Now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, and Adlibris.com. Mastos in the Berbati Valley. An intensive archaeological survey By Michael Lindblom & Berit Wells (eds.) This study presents the results of a small but intensive surface survey conducted on the Mastos Hill in the Berbati Valley in 1999. While remains from the Early and Late Helladic period were known from previous excavations on its southern and eastern slopes, this is the first analysis of the entire hill. It includes a digital documentation of the local topography as well as an account of the archaeological remains retrieved in the field. The study fills a gap in different data sets and results gained through old excavations and the extensive 1988–1990 Berbati-Limnes survey. The introductory chapter summarizes previous work in the valley, discusses its ancient routes of communication and outlines the method employed in the archaeological survey. This is followed by an account of the topographical survey and the geographical information system used. In the six following chapters the archaeological remains are presented and analyzed in a diachronic fashion. It is concluded that the hill was predominantely settled in prehistory with the exception of a…

The Berbati-Limnes Archaeological Survey 1988–1990

Distributed by Astrom Editions. View record at WorldCat. The Berbati-Limnes Archaeological Survey 1988–1990 By Berit Wells & Curtis Runnels (eds.) This volume presents the results of the surface survey carried out in the Berbati Valley and on the Limnes plateau for three seasons between 1988 and 1990. Both in ancient and modern times the two areas differ considerably both economically and politically, which in part is due to the natural environment, Prosímni (Berbati) lying in a fertile valley and Limnes in a mountainous district. The introductory chapter gives a general background to the project, introducing the two villages involved, presenting the objectives and setting out the methods employed in the field. For much of its history the Berbati-Limnes area depended upon external economic systems and powers. Thus the Final Neolithic–Early Helladic pastoral economy can be explained as part of the developments in the Balkans called the Secondary Products Revolution. These changes resulted in the catastrophic soil erosions which more or less depopulated the area at the end of the EH. The recovery was slow. Only towards the end of Middle Helladic does there seem to be a new beginning, which heralds intensive use of the area in the Late Bronze…