Returns to Pompeii

Now available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com, and Bokorder.se By Shelley Hales & Anne-Marie Leander Touati (eds.) This volume presents a series of case studies that trace the ways in which audiences across Europe have attempted to return to Pompeii by emulating its interior decorations since the city’s rediscovery in the mid-eighteenth century. As such, it is about both the impact of Pompeian antiquity on the present and the reception in the present of that antique past, exploring the variety of ways in which Pompeian domestic space and decoration have been revived (and for what purposes and audiences). The contributions to the volumes compare the ways in which Pompeian wall decorations were interpreted and adapted, given new context and put to serve new social and political purposes, both close to their place of discovery, in the Kingdom of Naples, and in the far-off European periphery, represented by Denmark and Sweden. The many images presented to the reader in this volume confirm colour, fantasy and playfulness, alongside an almost academic orthodoxy of structure, as trademarks of a defined neo-Pompeian style. The volume brings together scholars from different disciplines; archaeologists, arthistorians, pigment technicians and decorators, all of whom have participated…

Unexpected Voices

Now available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com, and Bokorder.se Unexpected Voices. The Graffiti in the Cryptoporticus of the Horti Sallustiani and Papers from a Conference on Graffiti at the Swedish Institute in Rome, 7 march 2003 By Olof Brandt (ed.) This volume presents the results of a collaboration between the Swedish Institute in Rome and the Embassy of the United States of America in Rome. The object of the research was a cryptoporticus, part of the ancient Horti Sallustiani, in the area of the American Embassy, and especially the graffiti found on the walls of the cryptoporticus, which were also decorated with paintings. The cryptoporticus, which is dated to the first century AD, was excavated in 1949–1950 and in the 1990s, but the graffiti have never been completely published. In this publication, all the graffiti are discussed and dated. Some belong to Late Antiquity, others were made in the 16th and 17th centuries. The study of these graffiti gives important information about the later fate of the first-century cryptoporticus. Several unpublished fragments of wall-paintings are also presented, and more general historic and archaeological aspects of the cryptoporticus are discussed. Part of the project was the first conference ever…

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