San Lorenzo in Lucina

Now available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com, and Bokorder.se San Lorenzo in Lucina. The transformations of a Roman quarter By Olof Brandt (ed.) This volume presents the results of research carried out by the Swedish Institute in Rome in the Roman church of San Lorenzo in Lucina. This research involved the Roman phases of the site and the surrounding quarter. The research began with the 1993–1998 excavation of the baptistery of the Early Christian church, and continued in 2000 with a project which also included other parts, aspects and periods of the site. The papers in this volume shed new light on the Late Roman and post-Antique development of an area which is between Augustan monuments such as the Ara Pacis, the Mausoleum of Augustus, the obelisk and its meridian. The papers include studies on the early 3rd century insula beneath the church, the baptistery and the Early Christian basilica, as well a survey of hagiographic legends, medieval wall-paintings, and other finds such as inscriptions and graffiti, pottery, glass, marble, bones and spolia. Reports on the conservation on fragments of Roman wall-paintings and marble fragments are also included. Contents Barbro Santillo Frizell | Preface Olof Brandt | Introduction…

Unexpected Voices

Now available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com, and Bokorder.se Unexpected Voices. The Graffiti in the Cryptoporticus of the Horti Sallustiani and Papers from a Conference on Graffiti at the Swedish Institute in Rome, 7 march 2003 By Olof Brandt (ed.) This volume presents the results of a collaboration between the Swedish Institute in Rome and the Embassy of the United States of America in Rome. The object of the research was a cryptoporticus, part of the ancient Horti Sallustiani, in the area of the American Embassy, and especially the graffiti found on the walls of the cryptoporticus, which were also decorated with paintings. The cryptoporticus, which is dated to the first century AD, was excavated in 1949–1950 and in the 1990s, but the graffiti have never been completely published. In this publication, all the graffiti are discussed and dated. Some belong to Late Antiquity, others were made in the 16th and 17th centuries. The study of these graffiti gives important information about the later fate of the first-century cryptoporticus. Several unpublished fragments of wall-paintings are also presented, and more general historic and archaeological aspects of the cryptoporticus are discussed. Part of the project was the first conference ever…

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