Marsyas in the garden?
Article , Content / 2010-12-02

Opuscula 3 (2010) is now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, and Adlibris.com. Marsyas in the garden? Small-scale sculptures referring to Marsyas in the forum By Julia Habetzeder Abstract While studying a small-scale sculpture in the collections of the Nationalmuseum in Stockholm, I noticed that it belongs to a previously unrecognized sculpture type. The type depicts a paunchy, bearded satyr who stands with one arm raised. To my knowledge, four replicas exist. By means of stylistic comparison, they can be dated to the late second to early third centuries AD. Due to their scale and rendering they are likely to have been freestanding decorative elements in Roman villas or gardens. The iconography of the satyrs of the type discussed is closely related to that of a group of fountain figures. These fountain figures are believed to refer to a motif well known in Roman times: the Marsyas in the forum. In this article I argue that the satyrs of the type discussed refer as well to this once famous depiction of Marsyas. Bibliographical information Julia Habetzeder, ‘Marsyas in the garden? Small-scale sculptures referring to Marsyas in the forum’, Opuscula. Annual of the…

Zersägte Köpfe. Die Transformation antiker Porträts zu monumentalen Gemmenbildern im 18. Jahrhundert
Article , Content / 2009-12-02

Opuscula 2 (2009) is now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com and Adlibris.com. Zersägte Köpfe. Die Transformation antiker Porträts zu monumentalen Gemmenbildern im 18. Jahrhundert By Dagmar Grassinger Abstract Im 18. Jahrhundert wurden fragmentiert erhaltene antike Porträtköpfe bisweilen in der Längsachse geteilt und beide Hälften separat als Profilköpfe auf marmorne Hintergründe montiert. Diese Marmorhintergründe hatten häufig die Form ovaler Medaillons mit mehr oder weniger aufwendig profilierten Rahmen. Durch diese Restaurierungspraxis entstand mit solchen Porträtmedaillons eine Reliefgattung, die uns in dieser Form aus der Antike selbst so gut wie gar nicht überliefert ist, die aber im 18. Jahrhundert offenbar einen Nerv der Zeit getroffen hat. Die Porträtmedaillons mit ihren leicht erhabenen Profilköpfen können als monumentalisierte Gemmenabdrücke in Stein verstanden werden. Angeregt wurden sie wohl durch zahlreiche zeitgenössische Gemmenpublikationen in opulenten Stichwerken und den durch diese generierten „Gemmenblick“ der Betrachter. So geben diese zu monumentalen Gemmenabdrücken transformierten Porträthälften Aufschluss zu Wahrnehmungs- und Sehgewohnheiten ihrer Entstehungszeit. Sie sind Teil eines ästhetischen Zeitphänomens, das antike Denkmäler durch den Umriss ihrer Formen definiert. Bibliographical information Dagmar Grassinger, ‘Zersägte Köpfe. Die Transformation antiker Porträts zu monumentalen Gemmenbildern im 18. Jahrhundert’, Opuscula. Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens…

Die Büste eines Afrikaners aus der Sammlung Piranesi in Stockholm
Article , Content / 2008-12-02

Opuscula 1 (2008) is out of print. Available for free download at Bokorder.se. Used copies might be available at Amazon.com and Amazon.de. Die Büste eines Afrikaners aus der Sammlung Piranesi in Stockholm By Carmen Marcks Abstract A portrait bust of an African placed among the antiquities in the Royal Museum at Stockholm once belonged to the Roman artist Giovanni Battista Piranesi. It was brought to Sweden at the end of the 18th century at the instance of King Gustav III. The head is a work of the middle or second half of the 16th century. It belongs to a specific, local, Roman form of Mannerist portraits, which have in common a remarkable affinity to antique imperial portrait busts. While the head is an eclectic work combining an idealized countenance—a contemporary peculiarity of portrait art—with antique usages of portrayal, the bust itself seems to be a work that stands directly in the tradition of cinquecentesque Venetian busts. Obviously head and bust were not originally created as an ensemble. This contribution is only available in print. Bibliographical information Carmen Marcks, ‘Die Büste eines Afrikaners aus der Sammlung Piranesi in Stockholm’, Opuscula. Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome (OpAthRom) 1,…

Opuscula Romana 31–32 (2006–2007)
Opuscula Romana / 2008-12-01

Now available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com, and Bokorder.se. Contents Johnny R. Bengtsson | Late Bronze Age handles from the Apennine settlement at Luni sul Mignone: Some chronological observations Ingela M.B. Wiman & Yvonne Backe-Forsberg | Surfacing deities in later Etruscan art and the sacellum at San Giovenale Allan Klynne | The Villa Selvasecca revisited John W. Hayes | Villa Selvasecca: the pottery finds Ebba Engström & Ragnar Hedlund | Villa Selvasecca: the coins Dominic Ingemark | Villa Selvasecca: the glass Anne-Marie Leander Touati | Interim report of the Swedish Pompeii Project: Work 2000–2004/5 in Insula V 1. Introduction Margareta Staub Gierow | The House of the Greek Epigrams V 1,18.11–12: preliminary report 2000–2004 Arja Karivieri & Renée Forsell | The House of Caecilius Iucundus, V 1,22–27: a preliminary report Henrik Boman & Monica Nilsson | The commercial establishments V 1,13; V 1, 14–16; V 1,20–21: preliminary report 2001–2004 Mark Robinson | Evidence for garden cultivation and the use of bedding-out plants in the peristyle garden of the House of the Greek Epigrams (V 1, 18i) at Pompeii Henrik Boman & Monica Nilsson | The early street and the prehistoric finds in Vicolo delle Nozze d’Argento, Pompeii Jörg…

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