Plants in the sanctuary

Opuscula 12 (2019) is available for purchase at Amazon.com, Adlibris, and Bokus. Distributed by eddy.se ab at bokorder.se. Plants in the sanctuary. Charred seeds from Areas C and D at the Sanctuary of Poseidon at Kalaureia, Poros By Anaya Sarpaki (Independent scholar, Greece) Abstract Excavations at the Sanctuary of Poseidon at Kalaueria in the years 2003–2005 produced a small but quite interesting assemblage of charred seeds and fruits. Their analysis adds to a small existing body of such evidence and sheds light on several issues including aspects of the physical environment in the past, the agricultural economy in the area of the sanctuary, the role of plants in cult, and also the preparation and eating of plant foods and the possible alternative uses of them. The charred seeds that are presented here are part of a larger body of bioarchaeological remains that illuminate daily life in the sanctuary. Bibliographical information Anaya Sarpaki, ’Plants in the sanctuary. Charred seeds from Areas C and D at the Sanctuary of Poseidon at Kalaureia, Poros’, Opuscula. Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome (OpAthRom) 12, Stockholm 2019, 271–286. ISSN: 2000-0898. ISBN: 978-91-977799-1-3. https://doi.org/10.30549/opathrom-12-09 Bioarchaeological remains from the Sanctuary of Poseidon at Kalaureia…

The hand gesture and symbols of Sabazios
Article , Content / 2018-11-08

Opuscula 11 (2018) is available for purchase at Amazon.com, Adlibris, Bokus and bokorder.se. Distributed by eddy.se ab. The hand gesture and symbols of Sabazios By Susanne Berndt (Stockholm University). Abstract The material evidence left from the cult of Sabazios is meagre, apart from sculpted bronze hands dating to the Roman Empire. The hand is held in a certain pose, the so-called benedictio Latina gesture, and the hand was often covered with depictions of various objects and symbols. The bronze hands were probably attached to staffs and carried around in processions. This practice most likely spread via the channels of the Roman army during the Early Imperial period, but the gesture existed much earlier. The gesture is found on Attic black- and red-figured pottery, and is frequently associated with Hermes in his role as instructor and Psychopompos. From the beginning of the Hellenistic period the gesture was mainly used as an indication of speech, and for knowledge transmitted through speech. There are several examples of how the gesture was used to indicate the knowledge revealed through the initiations of mystery cults. Hermes is closely associated with Sabazios and is represented on the bronze hands, probably because of his role as instructor…

Castration, cult and agriculture

Opuscula 7 is now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com and Adlibris.com. Castration, cult and agriculture. Perspectives on Greek animal sacrifice By Gunnel Ekroth Abstract The castration of most male animals seems to have been the rule in ancient Greece when rearing cattle, sheep, goats, and pigs; only very few adult males are needed for breeding purposes and flocks of bulls, rams, billy-goats and boars are difficult to keep, since they are too aggressive. Castrated males yield more and fattier meat, and, in the case of sheep, more wool. Still, sacred laws and sacrificial calendars stipulate the sacrifice of uncastrated victims, and vase-paintings frequently represent bulls, rams and billy-goats in ritual contexts. This paper will discuss the role of uncastrated male animals in Greek cult in the Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic periods, both from a religious and an agricultural perspective. Of particular interest are the relations between the practical, economic reality and the theological perception of sacrifice. These issues will be explored using epigraphical, literary, iconographical and zooarchaeological evidence. Bibliographical information Gunnel Ekroth, ‘Cult, castration and agriculture. Perspectives on Greek animal sacrifice’, Opuscula. Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome…

The role of religion in the early Greek polis

Distributed by Astrom Editions. See record at WorldCat: http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/849019970. The role of religion in the early Greek polis. Proceedings of the Third International Seminar on Ancient Greek Cult, organized by the Swedish Institute at Athens, 16–18 October 1992 Edited by Robin Hägg These twelve papers read at an international seminar in Athens deal with various aspects of the role of religion in the early Greek polis, based on the epigraphical, iconographical and archaeological evidence. Among the special topics discussed are territorial myths and the mythical articulations with regard to the early polis, the Greek temple-builders, the distribution of offerings and rituals between graves and sanctuaries, the development of sacred and profane civic ideology in Athens, processions (pompai), verbal and ritual obscenity in women’s cults, prohibitionary inscriptions, the role of the seer, the Thesmophorion in central Athens, the cults in Solonian Athens, cults by the seashore and Dionysos at Argos. Contents Preface (p. 7) Irad Malkin | The polis between myths of land and territory (pp. 9–19) Walter Burkert | Greek temple builders: who, where and why? (pp. 21–29) François de Polignac | Entre les dieux et les morts. Statut individual et rites collectifs dans la cite archaïque (pp. 31–40) Sanne…