Mastos in the Berbati Valley

Open access, use links below. Printed edition distributed by Eddy.se AB. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, and Adlibris.com. Mastos in the Berbati Valley. An intensive archaeological survey By Michael Lindblom & Berit Wells (eds.) This study presents the results of a small but intensive surface survey conducted on the Mastos Hill in the Berbati Valley in 1999. While remains from the Early and Late Helladic period were known from previous excavations on its southern and eastern slopes, this is the first analysis of the entire hill. It includes a digital documentation of the local topography as well as an account of the archaeological remains retrieved in the field. The study fills a gap in different data sets and results gained through old excavations and the extensive 1988–1990 Berbati-Limnes survey. The introductory chapter summarizes previous work in the valley, discusses its ancient routes of communication and outlines the method employed in the archaeological survey. This is followed by an account of the topographical survey and the geographical information system used. In the six following chapters the archaeological remains are presented and analyzed in a diachronic fashion. It is concluded that the hill was predominantely settled in prehistory with the exception…

Children Lost and Found

Open access, use link below. Printed edition available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com. Distributed by Eddy.se AB. Children Lost and Found. A bioarchaeological study of Middle Helladic children in Asine with a comparison to Lerna By Anne Ingvarsson-Sundström This study focuses on children’s living conditions during the Middle Helladic period in Greece. The primary material comprises disarticulated skeletal remains found in a stratigraphic context during the Swedish excavations of Asine in 1926: 4,583 fragments/complete bones. These made up 103 subadults and 36 adults by means of Minimum Number of Individual (MNI) calculations. It was possible to assign subadult skeletal remains to 39 of the 105 already published graves in the Lower Town of Asine. In addition, children’s graves and skeletal remains from the neighbouring site of Lerna (periods IV–VI) are considered for comparisons of demography, health and mortuary treatment. The wider archaeological context, i.e., the published mortuary material from the settlements and cemeteries, is also examined and used to describe the community’s perception of children. It is necessary to consider children in past cultures as active and constantly changing individuals, possessing different social roles during the course of their life. Given that a culture’s perception and definition of…

From huts to houses

Distributed by Astrom Editions. See record at WorldCat. From huts to houses. Transformations of ancient societies. Proceedings of an international seminar organized by the Norwegian and Swedish Institutes in Rome, 21–24 September 1997 J. Rasmus Brandt & Lars Karlsson, eds. The present volume contains 43 of the 43 announced papers and 11 posters presented at an international conference in Rome in 1997. In a cross-cultural context, the papers examine various aspects of transformation processes connected with architectural changes, covering themes such as building types and development, building function, building technology, and finance and organization. Within this framework, the investigations span a long era, extending from the Mesolithic period to modern times, including experimental reconstructions of ancient dwellings. From the geographical and cultural point of view the contributions cover the Middle East and Europe from the Arabian deserts to the Arctic Ocean, though with a slight emphasis on central Italy in the Iron Age. The last article is a translation from Swedish to English of a study on shepherd huts in the Roman campagna made by S. Erixon in 1932, an article often quoted in studies on primitive architecture, but not easily accessible to all. Bibliographical information J. Rasmus Brandt &…

The Synagogue of Ancient Ostia and the Jews of Rome
ActaRom-4° / 2001-01-01

Distributed by Astrom Editions. The Synagogue of Ancient Ostia and the Jews of Rome. Interdisciplinary Studies Edited by Birger Olsson, Dieter Mitternacht & Olof Brandt In March of 1997 a research project on the ancient synagogue began at Lund University, Sweden, continuing a tradition of research that has its roots in the 1930s. The project’s title “The Ancient Synagogue: Birthplace of Two World Religions” suggests that Judaism and Christianity existed for a time in close proximity to each other and were shaped by the same particular milieu within the ancient world, namely, the synagogue. The synagogue in ancient Ostia was chosen as an initial case study, since there is evidence that it was built during the first century CE and consequently is one of the earlier synagogues in the Roman world to have been excavated. Olof Brandt presents for the first time a more extensive description of the area outside the city walls where the synagogue was built. Anders Runesson surveys all the material that has been published about Ostia in order to make a new reconstruction of the synagogue’s history in Ostia. Magnus Zetterholm attempts, primarily with the aid of interpretative theories and general considerations, to sketch the relations…