San Lorenzo in Lucina

Now available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com, and Bokorder.se San Lorenzo in Lucina. The transformations of a Roman quarter By Olof Brandt (ed.) This volume presents the results of research carried out by the Swedish Institute in Rome in the Roman church of San Lorenzo in Lucina. This research involved the Roman phases of the site and the surrounding quarter. The research began with the 1993–1998 excavation of the baptistery of the Early Christian church, and continued in 2000 with a project which also included other parts, aspects and periods of the site. The papers in this volume shed new light on the Late Roman and post-Antique development of an area which is between Augustan monuments such as the Ara Pacis, the Mausoleum of Augustus, the obelisk and its meridian. The papers include studies on the early 3rd century insula beneath the church, the baptistery and the Early Christian basilica, as well a survey of hagiographic legends, medieval wall-paintings, and other finds such as inscriptions and graffiti, pottery, glass, marble, bones and spolia. Reports on the conservation on fragments of Roman wall-paintings and marble fragments are also included. Contents Barbro Santillo Frizell | Preface Olof Brandt | Introduction…

Italian dreams, Roman longings
Article , Content / 2011-12-02

Opuscula 4 (2011) is now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, and Adlibris.com. Italian dreams, Roman longings. Vilhelm Lundström and the first Swedish philological-archaeological course in Rome, 1909 By Anna Blennow & Frederick Whitling Abstract In Sweden, the future of Classical Philology and the study of the ancient past remain uncertain a century after the first Swedish university course in Rome, led by Vilhelm Lundström, Professor of Latin at Gothenburg, and the simultaneous establishment of the study of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History in Swedish academia in 1909. The institutionalisation of the Swedish scholarly presence in Rome materialised with the establishment of the Swedish Institute in Rome (SIR) in 1925, and its inauguration the following year—partly as a result of Lundström’s pioneering initiative. The present article discusses the implications of Lundström’s course in Rome as well as in Sweden, and sheds light on his neohumanist vision of an integrated study of antiquity; with Classical Archaeology and Ancient History as integral elements of Classical Philology. This vision lay abandoned throughout the twentieth century, but deserves to be taken into account when discussing how philology relates to archaeology, or considering the study of antiquity…