Unexpected Voices

Now available for purchase at Bokorder.se Unexpected Voices. The Graffiti in the Cryptoporticus of the Horti Sallustiani and Papers from a Conference on Graffiti at the Swedish Institute in Rome, 7 march 2003 By Olof Brandt (ed.) This volume presents the results of a collaboration between the Swedish Institute in Rome and the Embassy of the United States of America in Rome. The object of the research was a cryptoporticus, part of the ancient Horti Sallustiani, in the area of the American Embassy, and especially the graffiti found on the walls of the cryptoporticus, which were also decorated with paintings. The cryptoporticus, which is dated to the first century AD, was excavated in 1949–1950 and in the 1990s, but the graffiti have never been completely published. In this publication, all the graffiti are discussed and dated. Some belong to Late Antiquity, others were made in the 16th and 17th centuries. The study of these graffiti gives important information about the later fate of the first-century cryptoporticus. Several unpublished fragments of wall-paintings are also presented, and more general historic and archaeological aspects of the cryptoporticus are discussed. Part of the project was the first conference ever dedicated exclusively to graffiti. The…

Carthage I

Now available for purchase at Astrom Editions Carthage I. Results of the Swedish excavations 1979–1983. A Roman bath in Carthage By Cathrine Gerner Hansen. With foreword by Birgitta Sander and Carl-Gustaf Styrenius and contributions by Serge Lancel and Gudrun Anselm This volume contains the architectural descriptions and analyses of the ruin found by the Swedish Mission to Carthage, SMC, during 1979–1980 within the Unesco programme Pour Sauver Carthage. An archaeological report will follow. The main plot, Site A, which was placed at the disposition of the SMC is located at the foot of the northern incline of Byrsa in the triangle between avenue de la Republique (now avenue de I’ Amphitheatre) and rue Mendes France. Since the excavations were established on the highest point of the saddle between the two Carthaginian heights Byrsa and Juno it was entirely unexpected when the remains of a Roman bath complex were revealed. The finds essentially confirm Saumagne’s theories regarding the layout of Roman Carthage. The main and best preserved remains, labelled Complex II, were part of lnsula 101 E making up the corner between the Cardo I E and Decumanus I N. Approximately 620 m2 of the building, hypothetically dated to originate from…