Carthage II

Now available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com and Bokorder.se Carthage II. The Swedish Mission to Carthage. Part of the UNESCO Project “Pour Sauver Carthage” By John Lund, Rita Larje and Harald Nilsson, with contributions by Maria Vretemark. Foreword by Kristian Göransson and epilogue by Birgitta Sander This second and final volume on the Swedish participation in the UNESCO project “Pour Sauver Carthage” 1979–1983 presents three detailed studies of excavated material from the Swedish main Site A at Carthage: terracotta lamps, animal bones and coins. The site is situated in central Carthage on the highest point of the saddle between the Carthaginian heights Byrsa and Juno. Excavations unearthed somewhat unexpectedly a building complex with a small Roman and Late Antique bath. Approximately 7000 finds were registered, and of them only the three categories presented in this volume have been analyzed in their entirety. They show that the latest building complex was used through to the 7th century AD. Circa 893 (mainly fragments of) terracotta lamps found at Site A are published and analytically studied in Chapter 1. A large amount of bones from mammals, birds and fish are studied and analysed in Chapter 2. The catalogue of the coinage…

Roof-tiles and Tile-roofs at Poggio Civitate (Murlo)

Now available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com and Bokorder.se By Örjan Wikander, with contributions by Fredrik Tobin This book has various aims: presenting and discussing the roof-tiles discovered at Poggio Civitate, trying to reconstruct the many roofs they once covered, and outlining the general development of roof-tiles and tiled roofs in Central Italy during the period from c. 650 to 200 BC. Moreover, it also brings the author’s earlier studies of skylight-tiles and Archaic simas up to date. Five chapters present typological features of separate tile categories (Ch. I), distribution of terracottas (including the decorative ones) on various roofs (Ch. II), technical issues concerning the production of tiles, their placement on roofs and the collapse of these roofs (Ch. III), plastic and painted decoration (Ch. IV), and the conclusions that can be drawn concerning the chronology of the Poggio Civitate roofs together with a sketch of the introduction and early diffusion of tiled roofs in Central Italy (Ch. V). In one of the appendices letters and signs found on more than three hundred Poggio Civitate tiles are presented and discussed in detail. Bibliographical information Örjan Wikander, Roof-tiles and Tile-roofs at Poggio Civitate (Murlo). The emergence of Central Italic…

Returns to Pompeii

Now available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com, and Bokorder.se By Shelley Hales & Anne-Marie Leander Touati (eds.) This volume presents a series of case studies that trace the ways in which audiences across Europe have attempted to return to Pompeii by emulating its interior decorations since the city’s rediscovery in the mid-eighteenth century. As such, it is about both the impact of Pompeian antiquity on the present and the reception in the present of that antique past, exploring the variety of ways in which Pompeian domestic space and decoration have been revived (and for what purposes and audiences). The contributions to the volumes compare the ways in which Pompeian wall decorations were interpreted and adapted, given new context and put to serve new social and political purposes, both close to their place of discovery, in the Kingdom of Naples, and in the far-off European periphery, represented by Denmark and Sweden. The many images presented to the reader in this volume confirm colour, fantasy and playfulness, alongside an almost academic orthodoxy of structure, as trademarks of a defined neo-Pompeian style. The volume brings together scholars from different disciplines; archaeologists, arthistorians, pigment technicians and decorators, all of whom have participated…

San Giovenale, vol. 5, fasc. 1: The Borgo

Now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, and Adlibris.com. San Giovenale. The Borgo. Excavating an Etruscan Quarter: Architecture and Stratigraphy By Carl Nylander, Börje Blomé, Lars Karlsson, Angela Bizzarro, Giuseppe Tilia, Stefano Tilia & Alessandro Tilia The Etruscan city of San Giovenale was excavated by the Swedish Institute of Classical Studies at Rome between 1956 and 1965. The ancient city plateau consists of two residential areas, the Acropolis and the Borgo, separated by a cut roadway. This publication deals only with the northwest corner of the Borgo (Borgo NW), which was excavated under the direction of Carl Nylander between 1961 and 1965. Here, in a “pocket” at the edge of the plateau, the Etruscans built a small metal working quarter, surrounded by a defensive terrace wall. Protected by the high tufa cliff a series of water cisterns and furnaces were installed. The excavations uncovered four major houses, Houses A, B, C and D, separated from each other by small drains and a Lane K. The houses, the drains and lanes are oriented west–east. A major well is located east and above House C. The most important settlement dates from the early Archaic…

San Lorenzo in Lucina

Now available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com, and Bokorder.se San Lorenzo in Lucina. The transformations of a Roman quarter By Olof Brandt (ed.) This volume presents the results of research carried out by the Swedish Institute in Rome in the Roman church of San Lorenzo in Lucina. This research involved the Roman phases of the site and the surrounding quarter. The research began with the 1993–1998 excavation of the baptistery of the Early Christian church, and continued in 2000 with a project which also included other parts, aspects and periods of the site. The papers in this volume shed new light on the Late Roman and post-Antique development of an area which is between Augustan monuments such as the Ara Pacis, the Mausoleum of Augustus, the obelisk and its meridian. The papers include studies on the early 3rd century insula beneath the church, the baptistery and the Early Christian basilica, as well a survey of hagiographic legends, medieval wall-paintings, and other finds such as inscriptions and graffiti, pottery, glass, marble, bones and spolia. Reports on the conservation on fragments of Roman wall-paintings and marble fragments are also included. Contents Barbro Santillo Frizell | Preface Olof Brandt | Introduction…

San Giovenale, vol. 2, fasc. 5: Two cisterns and a well in Area B

Now available for purchase at Bokus.com, Adlibris.com, and Bokorder.se San Giovenale. Two cisterns and a well in Area B By Ingrid Pohl Area B on the San Giovenale plateau was inhabited during the Bronze Age, the Iron Age, the Archaic period, the Hellenistic period and Medieval times. Trial trench AP 2 in Area B was excavated by B.E. Thomasson in 1958–1959 and by B. Olinder in 1960 and 1961, uncovering two underground cisterns dated to the Archaic period (CI and CII) and a fourth- to third-century well (W). In this volume, the cisterns and the well are published together with the pottery and other finds found within them. A presentation of the structures is followed by a catalogue including pottery and minor finds of terracotta, metal, glass and stone, as well as tiles. The pottery assemblage includes Greek imported wares, Italic or local painted and glazed ware, unpainted fine wares (Bucchero, Fine Cream ware), as well as household wares, kitchen wares, large jars, dolia and pithoi. The finds are illustrated by figures and plates. A general discussion presents an overview of the pottery according to wares followed by a discussion on the minor finds and the structures themselves. The finds…

Via Tiburtina
ActaRom-4° / 2009-03-01

Now available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com, and Bokorder.se Via Tiburtina. Space, Movement & Artefacts in the Urban Landscape By Hans Bjur & Barbro Santillo Frizell (eds.) How can cities integrate historic layers into their urban development? How can tangible and intangible heritages be read, interpreted and utilised in a sustainable city and landscape development? What significance could an ancient road have in this context? These are the overall questions in this book. It contains a number of different approaches to the interaction between the ancient road Via Tiburtina and the surrounding urban landscape east of Rome towards Tivoli, a rich palimpsest of distinguishable interrelated layers created over at least three millennia. One hypothesis being explored is that structures like Via Tiburtina still can determine the morphology of the urban landscape. Settlements, buildings, space, movement and cultural artefacts have therefore come into focus in investigating whether broken connections could be re-established, and thus creating a dialogue between Rome’s earlier epochs and the future. Contents Index map Introduction Hans Bjur & Barbro Santillo Frizell | Ways to urban landscape archaeology Hans Bjur | That’s the way it is Movement Barbro Santillo Frizell | Changing pastures Simon Malmberg | Navigating…

San Giovenale, vol. 5, fasc. 2: The Borgo

Now available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com, and Bokorder.se San Giovenale. The Borgo. The Etruscan habitation quarter on the North-West slope. Stratification and materials By Ingrid Pohl During 1961–1963 and 1965, excavations were carried out on the so-called Borgo as part of the large-scale archaeological investigations of San Giovenale which took place in 1956–1965. A large habitation complex consisting of houses, courtyards, lanes and wells was uncovered. The architectural remains and their stratigraphy will be presented in Part I of the publication. In this part (Part 2) the stratigraphy and the material found in the excavations are presented. Bibliographical information Ingrid Pohl, San Giovenale. The Borgo. The Etruscan habitation quarter on the North-West slope. Stratification and materials, (Skrifter utgivna av Svenska Institutet i Rom, 4°, 26, vol. 5, fasc. 2), Stockholm 2009. ISSN: 0081-993X. ISBN: 978-91-7042-176-1. Softcover: 114 pages.

Unexpected Voices

Now available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com, and Bokorder.se Unexpected Voices. The Graffiti in the Cryptoporticus of the Horti Sallustiani and Papers from a Conference on Graffiti at the Swedish Institute in Rome, 7 march 2003 By Olof Brandt (ed.) This volume presents the results of a collaboration between the Swedish Institute in Rome and the Embassy of the United States of America in Rome. The object of the research was a cryptoporticus, part of the ancient Horti Sallustiani, in the area of the American Embassy, and especially the graffiti found on the walls of the cryptoporticus, which were also decorated with paintings. The cryptoporticus, which is dated to the first century AD, was excavated in 1949–1950 and in the 1990s, but the graffiti have never been completely published. In this publication, all the graffiti are discussed and dated. Some belong to Late Antiquity, others were made in the 16th and 17th centuries. The study of these graffiti gives important information about the later fate of the first-century cryptoporticus. Several unpublished fragments of wall-paintings are also presented, and more general historic and archaeological aspects of the cryptoporticus are discussed. Part of the project was the first conference ever…

Carthage I

Now available for purchase at Astrom Editions, Amazon.com, and Amazon.de. Carthage I. Results of the Swedish excavations 1979–1983. A Roman bath in Carthage By Cathrine Gerner Hansen. With foreword by Birgitta Sander and Carl-Gustaf Styrenius and contributions by Serge Lancel and Gudrun Anselm This volume contains the architectural descriptions and analyses of the ruin found by the Swedish Mission to Carthage, SMC, during 1979–1980 within the Unesco programme Pour Sauver Carthage. An archaeological report will follow. The main plot, Site A, which was placed at the disposition of the SMC is located at the foot of the northern incline of Byrsa in the triangle between avenue de la Republique (now avenue de I’ Amphitheatre) and rue Mendes France. Since the excavations were established on the highest point of the saddle between the two Carthaginian heights Byrsa and Juno it was entirely unexpected when the remains of a Roman bath complex were revealed. The finds essentially confirm Saumagne’s theories regarding the layout of Roman Carthage. The main and best preserved remains, labelled Complex II, were part of lnsula 101 E making up the corner between the Cardo I E and Decumanus I N. Approximately 620 m2 of the building, hypothetically dated…

Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial