Roof-tiles and Tile-roofs at Poggio Civitate (Murlo)
ActaRom-4° / 2017-10-31

Now available for purchase at Bokorder.se By Örjan Wikander, with contributions by Fredrik Tobin This book has various aims: presenting and discussing the roof-tiles discovered at Poggio Civitate, trying to reconstruct the many roofs they once covered, and outlining the general development of roof-tiles and tiled roofs in Central Italy during the period from c. 650 to 200 BC. Moreover, it also brings the author’s earlier studies of skylight-tiles and Archaic simas up to date. Five chapters present typological features of separate tile categories (Ch. I), distribution of terracottas (including the decorative ones) on various roofs (Ch. II), technical issues concerning the production of tiles, their placement on roofs and the collapse of these roofs (Ch. III), plastic and painted decoration (Ch. IV), and the conclusions that can be drawn concerning the chronology of the Poggio Civitate roofs together with a sketch of the introduction and early diffusion of tiled roofs in Central Italy (Ch. V). In one of the appendices letters and signs found on more than three hundred Poggio Civitate tiles are presented and discussed in detail. Bibliographical information Örjan Wikander, Roof-tiles and Tile-roofs at Poggio Civitate (Murlo). The emergence of Central Italic tile industry (Skrifter utgivna av…

Returns to Pompeii

Now available for purchase at Bokorder.se By Shelley Hales (ed.) & Anne-Marie Leander Touati (ed.) This volume presents a series of case studies that trace the ways in which audiences across Europe have attempted to return to Pompeii by emulating its interior decorations since the city’s rediscovery in the mid-eighteenth century. As such, it is about both the impact of Pompeian antiquity on the present and the reception in the present of that antique past, exploring the variety of ways in which Pompeian domestic space and decoration have been revived (and for what purposes and audiences). The contributions to the volumes compare the ways in which Pompeian wall decorations were interpreted and adapted, given new context and put to serve new social and political purposes, both close to their place of discovery, in the Kingdom of Naples, and in the far-off European periphery, represented by Denmark and Sweden. The many images presented to the reader in this volume confirm colour, fantasy and playfulness, alongside an almost academic orthodoxy of structure, as trademarks of a defined neo-Pompeian style. The volume brings together scholars from different disciplines; archaeologists, arthistorians, pigment technicians and decorators, all of whom have participated in this collective effort…