Inscriptions et timbres céramiques de Rhodes
ActaAth-4° , Catalogue / 2017-10-18

Now available for purchase at Bokus.com, Adlibris.com, and Bokorder.se By Nathan Badoud Johan Hedenborg (1786–1865) was a medical doctor whose curiosity gave him a wide interest in natural and social science. In 1825, he was attached to the embassy of Sweden and Norway to the Sublime Porte. After exploring the Aegean and both sides of the Red Sea for fifteen years, he settled in Rhodes with the aim of writing a history of the island. The manuscript, completed in 1857, was never published. It contains copies of 303 inscriptions on stone, 54 of them otherwise unknown, and drawings of more than 150 stamped amphora handles and tiles. All these documents are studied here. Bibliographical information Nathan Badoud, Inscriptions et timbres céramiques de Rhodes. Documents recueillis par le médecin et explorateur suédois Johan Hedenborg (1786-1865) (Skrifter utgivna av Svenska Institutet i Athen, 4°, 57), Stockholm 2017. ISBN: 978-91-791606-5-4. Hard cover, 145 pages.

The Greek-Swedish Excavations at the Agia Aikaterini Square, Kastelli, Khania vol. 5

Now available for purchase (two volumes sold together) at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com and Bokorder.se The Greek-Swedish Excavations at the Agia Aikaterini Square, Kastelli, Khania 1970–1987, 2001, 2005 and 2008. The Late Minoan IIIA:1 and II Settlements By Birgitta P. Hallager & Erik Hallager (eds.) During the years of excavation the LM II and LM IIIA:1 period was always considered a unit, called “Level 5”. The following detailed studies of stratigraphy and pottery, however, made it clear that the two chronological phases at the GSE also represented two different stratigraphic units. After the LM IB destruction at the site a few rooms of the destroyed houses were cleaned of the destruction debris and repaired to offer very modest living conditions. While the part of the settlement excavated by the GSE can only be described as a squatter habitation during LM II and LM IIIA:1 there can be little doubt that an important part of the settlement existed nearby. This can be deduced from two observations at the GSE. One observation is the fact that the old streets were cleaned of destruction debris and maintained throughout the period showing that communication within the town was still needed. The second observation is the…

Mycenaeans up to date

Now available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com, and Bokorder.se Mycenaeans up to date. The archaeology of the northeastern Peloponnese—current concepts and new directions By Ann-Louise Schallin & Iphiyenia Tournavitou (eds.) This volume contains the proceedings of the conference Mycenaeans up to date: The archaeology of the north-eastern Peloponnese—current concepts and new directions, which was held 10–16 November 2010, under the auspices of the Swedish Institute at Athens. The published papers reveal the latest news in the field of Mycenaean archaeology in the Argolid and the surrounding areas. Ongoing fieldwork, as well as new interpretations of the extant archaeological material is presented and discussed in detail. The first part of the volume consists of papers dealing with new, unpublished evidence regarding many of the well-known Argive sites, including Mycenae, Tiryns, Argos, Midea, and the Nemea Valley, among others. The second part is devoted to in-depth studies on a number of major themes, such as Mycenaean architecture, administration, mortuary practices and religion. Contents Ann-Louise Schallin & Iphiyenia Tournavitou | Introduction The Argolid Mycenae Elizabeth French | Tending the past, ensuring the future Kim Shelton | Pottery and Petsas House: Recent research on LH IIIA2 Mycenae Iphiyenia Tournavitou | The East…

Bones, behaviour and belief

Now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com and Adlibris.com. Bones, behaviour and belief. The zooarchaeological evidence as a source for ritual practice in ancient Greece and beyond By Gunnel Ekroth & Jenny Wallensten (eds.) The importance of the zooarchaeological evidence as a source for ritual practices in ancient Greece is gradually becoming widely recognized. Animal bones form the only category of evidence for Greek cult which is constantly significantly increasing, and they can complement and elucidate the information provided by texts, inscriptions and images. This volume brings together sixteen contributions exploring ritual practices and animal bones from different chronological and geographical perspectives, foremost ancient Greece in the historical period, but also in the Bronze Age and as early as the Neolithic period, as well as Anatolia, France and Scandinavia, providing new empirical evidence from a number of major sanctuaries and cult-places. On a methodological level, the complexity of identifying ritual activity from the zooarchaeological evidence is a recurrent theme, as is the prominence of local variation visible in the bone material, suggesting that the written sources and iconography may offer simplified or idealized versions of the rituals actually performed. Although zooarchaeology needs…

The Greek-Swedish Excavations at the Agia Aikaterini Square, Kastelli, Khania vol. 4

Now available for purchase (two volumes sold together) and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, and Adlibris.com. The Greek-Swedish Excavations at the Agia Aikaterini Square, Kastelli, Khania 1970–1987 and 2001. The Late Minoan IIIB:1 and IIIA:2 Settlements By Erik Hallager & Birgitta P. Hallager (eds.) This volume is the fourth in a series of seven presenting the results of the Greek-Swedish Excavations during the years 1970–1987 and 2001 in the Agia Aikaterini Square, Kastelli Khania. The excavations which are situated close to the harbour of the modern town of Khania, western Crete were under the direction of Dr Yannis Tzedakis and Professor Carl-Gustaf Styrenius. During the years of excavation the LM IIIA:2 and LM IIIB:1 period was always considered a unit, called “Level 4”. The following detailed studies of stratigraphy, pottery and architecture, however, made it clear that the two chronological phases at the GSE also represented two different stratigraphic units. By the end of the reoccupation phase in LM II and LM IIIA:1, one large important building, Building 2, was constructed in the LM IIIA:2 period. This building, of which only a small amount was unearthed within the Agia Aikaterini Square, continued in use until…

Mastos in the Berbati Valley

Now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, and Adlibris.com. Mastos in the Berbati Valley. An intensive archaeological survey By Michael Lindblom & Berit Wells (eds.) This study presents the results of a small but intensive surface survey conducted on the Mastos Hill in the Berbati Valley in 1999. While remains from the Early and Late Helladic period were known from previous excavations on its southern and eastern slopes, this is the first analysis of the entire hill. It includes a digital documentation of the local topography as well as an account of the archaeological remains retrieved in the field. The study fills a gap in different data sets and results gained through old excavations and the extensive 1988–1990 Berbati-Limnes survey. The introductory chapter summarizes previous work in the valley, discusses its ancient routes of communication and outlines the method employed in the archaeological survey. This is followed by an account of the topographical survey and the geographical information system used. In the six following chapters the archaeological remains are presented and analyzed in a diachronic fashion. It is concluded that the hill was predominantely settled in prehistory with the exception of a…

Children Lost and Found

Now available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com, and Bokorder.se Children Lost and Found. A bioarchaeological study of Middle Helladic children in Asine with a comparison to Lerna By Anne Ingvarsson-Sundström This study focuses on children’s living conditions during the Middle Helladic period in Greece. The primary material comprises disarticulated skeletal remains found in a stratigraphic context during the Swedish excavations of Asine in 1926: 4,583 fragments/complete bones. These made up 103 subadults and 36 adults by means of Minimum Number of Individual (MNI) calculations. It was possible to assign subadult skeletal remains to 39 of the 105 already published graves in the Lower Town of Asine. In addition, children’s graves and skeletal remains from the neighbouring site of Lerna (periods IV–VI) are considered for comparisons of demography, health and mortuary treatment. The wider archaeological context, i.e., the published mortuary material from the settlements and cemeteries, is also examined and used to describe the community’s perception of children. It is necessary to consider children in past cultures as active and constantly changing individuals, possessing different social roles during the course of their life. Given that a culture’s perception and definition of children are dependent on age or physical development,…

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