Dissertation abstracts 2017–2018

Opuscula 11 (2018) is available for purchase at bokorder.se. Distributed by eddy.se ab Dissertation abstracts 2017–2018 Stella Macheridis | Waste management, animals and society: A so­cial zooarchaeological study of Bronze Age Asine, PhD thesis, Historical Osteology, Lund University 2018. http://lup.lub.lu.se/record/578f52c0-f36d-4712-92e3-a08893c41934 Nikolaos Domazakis | The neologisms in 2 Maccabees, Centre for Languages and Literature, Lund University 2018. http://lup.lub.lu.se/record/4f750519-6fdc-436e-ac1f-16c8bd1f8cef Claudia Zichi | Poetic Diction and Poetic References in the Preludes of Plato’s Laws, Centre for Languages and Literature, Lund University 2018. http://lup.lub.lu.se/record/a5d1d4ea-9eab-4154-a0f8-b65664e80afc Aske Damtoft Poulsen | Accounts of Northern Barbarians in Tac­itus’ Annales: A Contextual Analysis, Centre for Languages and Literature, Lund University 2018. http://lup.lub.lu.se/record/930a80a9-11bf-443a-84c7-4c566f8497f6 Johan Vekselius | Weeping for the res publica. Tears in Roman political culture, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Lund University 2018. http://lup.lub.lu.se/record/b043bd37-a010-40a0-846a-77a379ddb8b9 Bibliographical information ‘Dissertation abstracts 2017–2018’, Opuscula. Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome (OpAthRom) 11, Stockholm 2018, 211–213. ISSN: 2000-0898. ISBN: 978-91-977799-0-6. https://doi.org/10.30549/opathrom-11-15

Book reviews
Book review , Content / 2018-11-08

Opuscula 11 (2018) is available for purchase at bokorder.se. Distributed by eddy.se ab Books reviewed in Opuscula 11 (2018) Floris van den Eijnde | X. Charalambidou & C. Morgan (eds.), Interpreting the seventh century BC. Tradition and innovation, Oxford: Archaeopress 2017. Viii + 460 pp., illustrated throughout in colour and black and white. ISBN 978-1-78491-572-8. https://doi.org/10.30549/opathrom-11-10 Petra Pakkanen | A. Weststeijn & F. Whitling, Termini. Cornerstone of modern Rome (Papers of the Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome, 65), Rome: Edizioni Quasar 2017. 162 pp., 120 figs. ISBN 978-88-7140-813-2. https://doi.org/10.30549/opathrom-11-11 Patrik Klingborg | K. Wellbrock, Die innerstädtische Wasserbewirtschaftung im hellenistisch-römischen Pergamon (Schriften der Deutschen Wasserhistorischen Gesellschaft—DWhG—e.V., Sonderband, 14), Siegburg: DWhG 2016. 370 pp., 80 pls. ISBN 978-3-86948-521-8. https://doi.org/10.30549/opathrom-11-12 Paavo Roos | R. Fleischer, Die Felsgräber der Könige von Pontos in Amasya (Istanbuler Forschungen, 56), Tübingen: Ernst Wasmuth 2017. x + 155 pp., 122 figs. ISBN 978-38-03-01777-2. https://doi.org/10.30549/opathrom-11-13 Gullög Nordquist | A. Bellia & C. Marconi (eds.), Musicians in ancient coroplastic art. Iconography, ritual contexts, and functions (Telestes. Studi e ricerche di archeologia musicale nel Mediterranea, 2), Pisa & Rome: Ist. Editoriali e Poligrafici, 216 pp., black and white ills. ISBN 978-88-8147-458-5. https://doi.org/10.30549/opathrom-11-14 Bibliographical information ‘Book reviews’, Opuscula. Annual of the Swedish…

Cella alignment and 4th century BC Doric peripteral temple architecture in Mainland Greece
Article , Content / 2018-11-08

Opuscula 11 (2018) is available for purchase at bokorder.se. Distributed by eddy.se ab Cella alignment and 4th century BC Doric peripteral temple architecture in Mainland Greece By Chrysanthos Kanellopoulos & Manolis Petrakis Abstract This article examines 4th-century BC Doric architecture, dealing with the cella position in relation to the design of the peristasis. Divergences from the theoretical principles are recorded and the reasons dictating the aesthetics as well the traditions are examined. A categorization of Doric peripteral temples is put forward and five peripteral temples are discussed in detail, with new drawings offered; the temple on the Leprean acropolis, the Temple of Asclepios at Gortyn, the Temple of Apollo Ismenios at Thebes, the Temple of Apollo at Mount Ptoion, and the so-called Temple of Hippolytos at Troizen. It is inferred that the previously reconstructed Ionic axial cohesion in the temples under examination has taken into account neither the principles of the Doric order, nor the correct sizes of the elements. An argued evaluation of the physical evidence is necessary for reconstructing the implemented ground-plans. By taking the above into consideration and by re-examining the existing foundations, it is possible to reconstruct features such as the lower diameter of the pronaos…

The hand gesture and symbols of Sabazios
Article , Content / 2018-11-08

Opuscula 11 (2018) is available for purchase at bokorder.se. Distributed by eddy.se ab The hand gesture and symbols of Sabazios By Susanne Berndt Abstract The material evidence left from the cult of Sabazios is meagre, apart from sculpted bronze hands dating to the Roman Empire. The hand is held in a certain pose, the so-called benedictio Latina gesture, and the hand was often covered with depictions of various objects and symbols. The bronze hands were probably attached to staffs and carried around in processions. This practice most likely spread via the channels of the Roman army during the Early Imperial period, but the gesture existed much earlier. The gesture is found on Attic black- and red-figured pottery, and is frequently associated with Hermes in his role as instructor and Psychopompos. From the beginning of the Hellenistic period the gesture was mainly used as an indication of speech, and for knowledge transmitted through speech. There are several examples of how the gesture was used to indicate the knowledge revealed through the initiations of mystery cults. Hermes is closely associated with Sabazios and is represented on the bronze hands, probably because of his role as instructor and Psychopompos; i.e. the position played…

Painting early death
Article , Content / 2018-11-08

Opuscula 11 (2018) is available for purchase at bokorder.se. Distributed by eddy.se ab Painting early death. Deceased maidens on funerary vases in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens By Katia Margariti Abstract The present paper studies the iconography of dead maidens depicted on a red-figured funerary loutrophoros and six white-ground lekythoi in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens, all of them dating to the 5th century BC. The scenes painted on the vases under consideration are representative of the iconography employed by Classical Athenian vase-painters for the depiction of deceased maidens, parthenoi. Dead maidens are not frequently seen on funerary clay loutrophoroi, but mostly appear in psychopompoi, tomb visit, and prothesis scenes of white lekythoi, where their premature death before marriage is often emphasized by the fact that they are shown as brides through the use of wedding iconography elements. They are never portrayed being carried by Hypnos and Thanatos, but are only taken to Hades by Hermes and Charon. Even though the loutrophoros is generally considered to be the symbol par excellence of death before marriage, it is not indispensable to the depiction of maiden figures on white lekythoi. However, in scenes on white lekythoi showing a loutrophoros-hydria set…

The use of miniature pottery in Archaic–Hellenistic Greek sanctuaries
Article , Content / 2018-11-08

Opuscula 11 (2018) is available for purchase at bokorder.se. Distributed by eddy.se ab The use of miniature pottery in Archaic–Hellenistic Greek sanctuaries. Considerations on terminology and ritual practice By Signe Barfoed Abstract Miniature pottery is a widely encountered group of archaeological material that has been found in domestic, funerary, and predominantly in ritual contexts. Despite the ubiquitous presence of these small vessels, this group is generally understudied and interpretations of its meaning are lacking. Scholarship in the past perceived miniature pottery as cheap, non-functional and unimportant and therefore this pottery was often neglected or sometimes not even published. Interpretations have been sparse and by default it is believed that miniatures were the cheapest dedications the worshipper could buy. Within the last decade(s) the perceptions among scholars have changed somewhat and when miniature pottery and other votives appear together in an excavation it is often interpreted as a votive deposit stemming from a ritual context, such as a temple, shrine or sanctuary. Below a tentative terminology of miniature pottery will be presented and it will be argued that there is more to be learned about Greek ritual practice from this understudied group of archaeological material, for instance, how miniatures were used…

Tokens of piety
Article , Content / 2018-11-08

Opuscula 11 (2018) is available for purchase at bokorder.se. Distributed by eddy.se ab Tokens of piety. Inexpensive dedications as functional and symbolic objects By Gina Salapata Abstract This article engages with some methods and theories of disciplines outside the traditional sphere of Classics to open up new perspectives on the interrelationship between material culture, religion and society. It focuses on dedicatory practices and, in particular, on modest offerings and the multiple ways these were valued in Greek society. It concludes that, even though small inexpensive offerings were affordable by poorer people, their dedicators likely came from various socio-economic backgrounds. Dedications of low economic value and modest appearance may have had high symbolic value because they embodied social and religious ideas or the desires and identities of the dedicator; or they could derive their value from the function they performed in ritual. If the messages carried by such offerings were of primary concern and their value symbolic and emotional rather than material, the choice of a small or inexpensive offering would not necessarily reflect lower socio-economic status. Moreover, if the main concern of gift giving were communication and reciprocity, the act of giving would have been more important than the offering’s…

Two Early Helladic II terracotta rollers from Asine and their glyptic context
Article , Content / 2018-11-08

Opuscula 11 (2018) is available for purchase at bokorder.se. Distributed by eddy.se ab Two Early Helladic II terracotta rollers from Asine and their glyptic context By Michael Lindblom, Gullög Nordquist & Hans Mommsen Abstract Two Early Helladic II terracotta rollers from the Third Terrace at Asine are presented. The objects, used to impress relief decoration on pithoi and hearths, are unique in that no other examples are known from the Early Bronze Age Aegean. Their origin is discussed based on chemical characterization and their depositional contexts are reviewed from an archaeological perspective. Although there are no known impressions from these rollers on pithoi and hearths at Asine, it is shown that their owners surrounded themselves with different objects featuring similar glyptic impressions. Two such impressions find identical parallels at Tiryns and the combined evidence strongly suggest that Asine was the home for one or several potters who produced Early Helladic impressed hearths and pithoi. Bibliographical information Michael Lindblom, Gullög Nordquist & Hans Mommsen, ’Two Early Helladic II terracotta rollers from Asine and their glyptic context’, Opuscula. Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome (OpAthRom) 11, Stockholm 2018, 81–96. ISSN: 2000-0898. ISBN: 978-91-977799-0-6. https://doi.org/10.30549/opathrom-11-04

The New Swedish Cyprus Expedition 2017

Opuscula 11 (2018) is available for purchase at bokorder.se. Distributed by eddy.se ab The New Swedish Cyprus Expedition 2017: Excavations at Hala Sultan Tekke (The Söderberg Expedition). Preliminary results By Peter M. Fischer, Teresa Bürge, Magda Ausiayevich, Bebelyn Placiente Robedizo, Victor Barrera Alarcón, Laerke Recht & Dominika Kofel Abstract During the eighth field season at the Bronze Age city of Hala Sultan Tekke, excavations in City Quarter 1 (CQ1) exposed massive industrial and domestic structures belonging to three phases of occupation (Strata 3–1) dating to the 13th and 12th centuries BC (LC IIC–IIIA). Georadar survey, penetrating to a maximum depth of approximately 1 m, guided the excavation of walls of Strata 1–2, both of which were destroyed by conflagration. Excavations 1.5–2 m below the surface and also below the maximum penetration depth of the radar revealed a heretofore buried phase of occupation with substantial architectural units. For the first time, massive Stratum 3 structures with a markedly different building technique were exposed. Copper smelting installations, much ash and slag, and storage facilities also belong to this phase of occupation. Additional excavations guided by results from a magnetometer survey were carried out in Area A, roughly 600 m to the south-east…

Preliminary report of the Malthi Archaeological Project, 2015–2016

Opuscula 11 (2018) is available for purchase at bokorder.se. Distributed by eddy.se ab Preliminary report of the Malthi Archaeological Project, 2015–2016 By Rebecca Worsham, Michael Lindblom & Claire Zikidi Abstract This article offers preliminary results and tentative interpretations of new work at the previously excavated settlement of Malthi in Messenia, south-west Pelopponese. The work included an intensive survey of the site architecture, as well as test excavations of spaces within and outside of the fortification wall. We propose updated observations on the chronology and phasing of the site based on pottery dates from the new excavation and comment on the preserved architecture as it compares to other settlements of the period. The settlement appears to have been first inhabited in the second half of the Middle Helladic period. Little, if any, architecture from this phase can be securely identified today. At the beginning of the Late Helladic period a fortification was erected, and the entire layout of the site was transformed. The construction likely took place as a single project, as argued by the original excavator, and so indicates a significant investment of labor and capital. Such an undertaking speaks not only to local access to wealth at this time,…

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