Labraunda 2008

Opuscula 2 (2009) is now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com and Adlibris.com. Labraunda 2008. A preliminary report on the Swedish excavations By Lars Karlsson, Jesper Blid & Olivier Henry Abstract The Swedish archaeological project at the Karian sanctuary of Zeus Labraundos celebrated, in 2008, sixty years of work. The year 2008 was very special, both because of these celebrations, but also because of the important finds that came to light during the excavation of the unusual Roman bath that was discovered in 2007. It is built in the shape of a four-leaf clover (the so-called Tetraconch), and can be dated to the first half of the fourth century AD. A large amount of finds were discovered, including superb pieces of plates in African Red Slip and Late Roman C wares, a water flask, and coloured marble pieces. In the necropolis, we excavated another 19 rock-cut tombs. The finds from these include a golden ring with a cornelian stone and 22 gold appliqués in the shape of rosettes and palmettes. The appliqués had four holes to fasten them to the drapery of the deceased. They are very similar to appliqués found in…

Radiocarbon analysis and the history of the East Cemetary, Asine

Opuscula 2 (2009) is now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com and Adlibris.com. Radiocarbon analysis and the history of the East Cemetary, Asine By Sofia Voutsaki, Søren Dietz & Albert J. Nijboer Abstract This paper presents the results of the radiocarbon analysis of human bones from the East Cemetery (IQ tumulus), Middle Helladic Asine. The analyses have been carried out at the Centre for Isotope Research, University of Groningen, using the AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy) method. The main aim of the analysis is to elucidate the history of use of the tumulus and the surrounding extramural cemetery by comparing the absolute dates with the relative dates based on the ceramic offerings and the internal stratigraphy of the tumulus. The establishment of a formal disposal area and the adoption of the tumulus are significant developments in the MH period, and it is therefore important to date their appearance with more precision. In addition, a more accurate reconstruction of the history of this important funerary monument gives us a better understanding of mortuary practices and social change in Asine, and in the MH mainland in general. Bibliographical information Sofia Voutsaki, Søren Dietz & Albert…

Excavations in Midea 2007

Opuscula 2 (2009) is now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com and Adlibris.com. Excavations in Midea 2007 By Katie Demakopoulou, Nicoletta Divari-Valakou, Monica Nilsson & Ann-Louise Schallin Abstract Excavations in Midea continued in 2007 as a Greek-Swedish programme under the direction of Dr Katie Demakopoulou in collaboration with Dr Ann-Louise Schallin. In the West Gate area excavation continued in the west part of the building complex that abuts the fortification wall. Room XIV was excavated with abundant remains of LH IIIB2 pottery. A sealstone with a unique, possibly ritual, scene was also found. On the lower west terrace of the acropolis excavation continued in Trench C, where a large section of the fortification wall was uncovered. Room I was excavated here, adjacent to the inner face of the fortification wall. Finds in this room date to the early phase of LH IIIC, under which there was ample evidence of the LH IIIB2 destruction, including human skeletons. Under this debris, a large opening leading to a gallery or syrinx through the thickness of the fortification wall was found. Excavation was resumed also in the East Gate area, where a new wall was revealed…

San Giovenale, vol. 5, fasc. 2: The Borgo

Now available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com, and Bokorder.se San Giovenale. The Borgo. The Etruscan habitation quarter on the North-West slope. Stratification and materials By Ingrid Pohl During 1961–1963 and 1965, excavations were carried out on the so-called Borgo as part of the large-scale archaeological investigations of San Giovenale which took place in 1956–1965. A large habitation complex consisting of houses, courtyards, lanes and wells was uncovered. The architectural remains and their stratigraphy will be presented in Part I of the publication. In this part (Part 2) the stratigraphy and the material found in the excavations are presented. Bibliographical information Ingrid Pohl, San Giovenale. The Borgo. The Etruscan habitation quarter on the North-West slope. Stratification and materials, (Skrifter utgivna av Svenska Institutet i Rom, 4°, 26, vol. 5, fasc. 2), Stockholm 2009. ISSN: 0081-993X. ISBN: 978-91-7042-176-1. Softcover: 114 pages.

Children Lost and Found

Now available for purchase at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, Adlibris.com, and Bokorder.se Children Lost and Found. A bioarchaeological study of Middle Helladic children in Asine with a comparison to Lerna By Anne Ingvarsson-Sundström This study focuses on children’s living conditions during the Middle Helladic period in Greece. The primary material comprises disarticulated skeletal remains found in a stratigraphic context during the Swedish excavations of Asine in 1926: 4,583 fragments/complete bones. These made up 103 subadults and 36 adults by means of Minimum Number of Individual (MNI) calculations. It was possible to assign subadult skeletal remains to 39 of the 105 already published graves in the Lower Town of Asine. In addition, children’s graves and skeletal remains from the neighbouring site of Lerna (periods IV–VI) are considered for comparisons of demography, health and mortuary treatment. The wider archaeological context, i.e., the published mortuary material from the settlements and cemeteries, is also examined and used to describe the community’s perception of children. It is necessary to consider children in past cultures as active and constantly changing individuals, possessing different social roles during the course of their life. Given that a culture’s perception and definition of children are dependent on age or physical development,…

Excavations in Midea 2006

Opuscula 1 (2008) is out of print. Available for free download at Bokorder.se. Used copies might be available at Amazon.com and Amazon.de. Excavations in Midea 2006 By Katie Demakopoulou, Nicoletta Divari-Valakou, Monica Nilsson, Ann-Louise Schallin & Kalliopi Nikita Abstract Excavations in Midea continued in 2006 as a Greek-Swedish programme under the direction of Dr. Katie Demakopoulou in collaboration with Dr. Ann-Louise Schallin. In the Upper Acropolis remains of an Early Helladic II defensive system were uncovered. East of this and at a lower level, a floor deposit was excavated with abundant pottery of Early Helladic I date including typical examples of the Talioti Ware. In the West Gate area excavation continued in the west part of the building complex adjacent to the fortification wall. Abundant Late helladic IIIB2 pottery was recovered from the exploration of two more rooms of the complex. A new trench was opened on the lower west terrace of the Acropolis in order to expose the line and the entire width of the fortification wall, which is almost completely covered by accumulated deposits in this area. Excavation was resumed in the East Gate area with the removal of a wide baulk and the investigation of the space…

Carthage I

Now available for purchase at Astrom Editions, Amazon.com, and Amazon.de. Carthage I. Results of the Swedish excavations 1979–1983. A Roman bath in Carthage By Cathrine Gerner Hansen. With foreword by Birgitta Sander and Carl-Gustaf Styrenius and contributions by Serge Lancel and Gudrun Anselm This volume contains the architectural descriptions and analyses of the ruin found by the Swedish Mission to Carthage, SMC, during 1979–1980 within the Unesco programme Pour Sauver Carthage. An archaeological report will follow. The main plot, Site A, which was placed at the disposition of the SMC is located at the foot of the northern incline of Byrsa in the triangle between avenue de la Republique (now avenue de I’ Amphitheatre) and rue Mendes France. Since the excavations were established on the highest point of the saddle between the two Carthaginian heights Byrsa and Juno it was entirely unexpected when the remains of a Roman bath complex were revealed. The finds essentially confirm Saumagne’s theories regarding the layout of Roman Carthage. The main and best preserved remains, labelled Complex II, were part of lnsula 101 E making up the corner between the Cardo I E and Decumanus I N. Approximately 620 m2 of the building, hypothetically dated…

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