Book reviews
Book review , Content / 2012-12-02

Opuscula 5 (2012) is now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, and Adlibris.com. Books reviewed in Opuscula 5 (2012) Adam J. Goldwyn | G. Van Steen. Theatre of the Condemned: Classical Tragedy on Greek Prison Islands (Classical Presences), Oxford: Oxford University Press 2011. xiv + 354 pp., 5 figs. ISBN 978-0-19-957288-5. http://doi.org/10.30549/opathrom-05-09 Susanne Carlsson | N. Papazarkadas, Sacred and public land in ancient Athens (Oxford Classical Monographs), Oxford: Oxford University Press 2011. xii + 395 pp. ISBN 978-0-19-969400-6. http://doi.org/10.30549/opathrom-05-10 Gunnel Ekroth | Aspects of ancient Greek cult. Context, ritual and iconography (Aarhus Studies in Mediterranean Antiquity, ASMA, 8), eds. Jesper Tae Jensen, George Hinge, Peter Schultz and Bronwen Wickkiser, Aarhus 2009. 245 pp. ISBN 978-87-7934-253-8. http://doi.org/10.30549/opathrom-05-11 Susanne Carlsson | A. Powell & S. Hodkinson (eds.), Sparta. The body politic (Study of Sparta), The Classical Press of Wales: Oxford 2010. viii + 348 pp., 5 figs. ISBN 978-1-905125-26-5. http://doi.org/10.30549/opathrom-05-12 Ingela M.B. Wiman | L. Bouke van der Meer (ed). Material Aspects of Etruscan Religion. Proceedings of the International Colloquium, Leiden, May 29 and 30, 2008. BABESCH, Annual Papers on Mediterranean Archaeology, supp 16, 2010, Leuven: Peeters, 2010. 1-164 pp. ISBN 978-90-429-2366-9. http://doi.org/10.30549/opathrom-05-13 Örjan…

The Swedish Jordan Expedition 2009 and 2010

Opuscula 5 (2012) is now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, and Adlibris.com. The Swedish Jordan Expedition 2009 and 2010 at Tall Abu al-Kharaz. Preliminary results from the Early Iron Age occupation in Area 9. With appendices by T. Bürge, and A. Gustafsson & J. Azzopardi By Peter M. Fischer Abstract Tall Abu al-Kharaz, in the central Jordan Valley, was occupied during approximately five millennia. A walled town, which had a dominant position in the Jordan Valley, existed already in the Early Bronze Age IB, viz. before 3050 BC. Walled settlements also flourished at the end of the Middle Bronze Age (around 1600 BC), during the Late Bronze Age (roughly 1500–1200 BC) and throughout the entire Iron Age (roughly 1200–600 BC). It is most likely that Tell Abu al-Kharaz is identical with Jabesh Gilead: this city is mentioned frequently in the Old Testament. During earlier seasons most of the Early Iron Age remains were found to have been disturbed by later settlers. It is, therefore, essential for the documentation of the settlement history of this city, that the expedition of 2009 unearthed an extremely well-preserved city quarter dating to the 12/11th century…

The impact of restoration
Article , Content / 2012-12-02

Opuscula 5 (2012) is now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, and Adlibris.com. The impact of restoration. The example of the dancing satyr in the Uffizi By Julia Habetzeder Abstract The aim of this article is to show that reputed restorations may have an unexpected impact on the study of ancient sculpture. During the 17th–19th centuries, a number of restored antiques were held in exceptionally high regard. One of the consequences of their renown was the production of copies and adaptations in different scales and media. Such reproductions did not distinguish between the ancient and the restored parts of the work. Today these reproductions are centuries old, and in many cases their provenance has long since been forgotten. Therefore, such post-Antique sculptures are easily misinterpreted as ancient. Subsequently, they are at times used as evidence of ancient sculptural production. Needless to say, this may cause flawed notions of Classical sculpture. The complexity of this relationship, between the ancient and the restored, is here exemplified by tracing the impact that a restored motif—“Satyrs with cymbals”—has had on the study of an ancient sculpture type: the satyr attributed to “The invitation to the dance”….

The water-mills on the Lamas River in Cilicia
Article , Content / 2012-12-02

Opuscula 5 (2012) is now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, and Adlibris.com. The water-mills on the Lamas River in Cilicia By Paavo Roos Abstract A water-mill establishment on the Lamas River in Cilicia was reported by travellers in the 19th century. It consisted of a series of parallel, horizontal-wheeled mills along an oblique rock face. It was the subject of examination in 1990 and a brief publication shortly afterwards. Due to its interesting and rather rare construction a more thorough publication is given here. Bibliographical information Paavo Roos, ‘The water-mills on the Lamas River in Cilicia’, Opuscula. Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome (OpAthRom) 5, 123–131. Stockholm 2012. ISSN: 2000-0898 ISBN: 978-91-977798-4-5. Softcover, 204 pages. http://doi.org/10.30549/opathrom-05-06

Euergetism and city-walls in the Italian city of Telesia
Article , Content / 2012-12-02

Opuscula 5 (2012) is now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, and Adlibris.com. Euergetism and city-walls in the Italian city of Telesia By Richard Ramanius Abstract Six inscriptions relating to the construction of the fortifications of the southern Italian town of Telesia were analyzed and compared to three inscriptions of the same type from the Italian town of Grumentum. The purpose of this was to gain insight into how Italian towns funded and organized the construction of city-walls during the Late Republic. The city-walls were built progressively in both towns, and in both cases were probably funded by private citizens, even if they were acting as magistrates. In Grumentum an older city-wall was gradually replaced by letting each new, annually elected magistrate build a new section. It would seem that in Telesia the walls were built first. The subsequent construction of the towers probably followed the plan of the local senate and was paid for by the magistrates themselves. The expressions pro ludeis/ludis on some inscriptions suggest that they were built instead of giving games. Bibliographical information Richard Ramanius, ‘Euergetism and city-walls in the Italian city of Telesia’, Opuscula. Annual of the…

The New Swedish Cyprus Expedition 2011

Opuscula 5 (2012) is now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, and Adlibris.com. The New Swedish Cyprus Expedition 2011. Excavations at Hala Sultan Tekke. Preliminary results. With appendices by T. Bürge, L. Franz and R. Feldbacher By Peter M. Fischer Abstract The main objective of the excavations of the Late Cypriote city of Hala Sultan Tekke is the investigation and determination of the complete occupational sequence of the pre-12th century levels. The groundpenetrating radar survey (GPR) led to the discovery and excavation of numerous rooms of a large Late Cypriote complex. During the second year of excavations at the site the expedition exposed a third phase of occupation (Stratum 3). A Stratum 2 compound, with extraordinarily wide walls was uncovered in the eastern part of the excavations. Intact vessels include Base-ring I and II, and White Painted VI, and Late Helladic imports. Other wares include: White Painted Pendant/Cross Line Style, Red-on-Black/Red, Bichrome Wheel-made, White Slip I and II, Monochrome, Base-ring I and II, Red Lustrous Wheel-made, White Painted/Plain-White Wheel-made, and White Shaved. Unique discoveries amongst the small finds are a haematite cylinder seal and a stone pendant figurine. The numerous tools related…

Labraunda 2011

Opuscula 5 (2012) is now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, and Adlibris.com. Labraunda 2011. A preliminary report on the Swedish excavations with an appendix by Ragnar Hedlund By Lars Karlsson, Jesper Blid & Olivier Henry Abstract The main goals of the 2011 campaign were the excavation of the Kepez tower, the West Church and the necropoleis. The tower of Kepez was excavated and black-gloss pottery indicates a date in the 3rd century BC. The 2011 excavations in the West Church uncovered three Late Roman and Byzantine building phases. Among the finds from Late Antiquity was a well-preserved glass lamp with a Greek inscription and a marble figurine, possibly representing an apostle or a saint. The excavations in the necropolis uncovered eleven tombs in the Area 5B, located along the Sacred Way, completing the excavation initiated in 2010. New tombs were discovered in the territory east and south of the sanctuary. Finally, the three stone sarcophagi inside the Built Tomb were moved in order to facilitate complete excavation and the cleaning of all the interior space of this monumental tomb. The conservation of architectural marble was continued and included the conservation of…

Dancing with decorum
Article , Content / 2012-12-02

Opuscula 5 (2012) is now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, and Adlibris.com. Dancing with decorum. The eclectic usage of kalathiskos dancers and pyrrhic dancers in Roman visual culture By Julia Habetzeder Abstract This article examines two groups of motifs in Roman visual culture: females modelled on kalathiskos dancers, and males modelled on pyrrhic dancers. Eclecticism is emphasized as a strategy which was used to introduce novelties that were appropriate within a Roman cultural context. The figures representing kalathiskos dancers and pyrrhic dancers were both changed in an eclectic manner and this resulted in motifs representing the goddess Victoria, and the curetes respectively. Kalathiskos dancers and eclectic Victoriae occur on many different media at least from the Augustan era and into the 2nd century AD. It is argued here that the establishment of these two motifs in Roman visual culture is closely related to the aesthetics which came to the fore during the reign of Augustus. Thereafter, both kalathiskos dancers and eclectic Victoriae lingered on in the Roman cultural context until many of the material categories on which they were depicted ceased to be produced. Unlike the kalathiskos dancers, the male figures…

Opuscula 5 (2012)
Open Access , Opuscula / 2012-12-01

Now available for purchase and free download at Bokorder.se. Also available at Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Bokus.com, and Adlibris.com. Contents Julia Habetzeder | Dancing with decorum. The eclectic usage of kalathiskos dancers and pyrrhic dancers in Roman visual culture Lars Karlsson, Jesper Blid & Olivier Henry | Labraunda 2011. A preliminary report on the Swedish excavations. With an appendix by R. Hedlund Peter M. Fischer | The New Swedish Cyprus Expedition 2011. Excavations at Hala Sultan Tekke. Preliminary results. With appendices by T. Bürge, L. Franz and R. Feldbacher Richard Ramanius | Euergetism and city-walls in the Italian city of Telesia Paavo Roos | The water-mills on the Lamas River in Cilicia Julia Habetzeder | The impact of restoration. The example of the dancing satyr in the Uffizi Peter M. Fischer | The Swedish Jordan Expedition 2009 and 2010 at Tall Abu al-Kharaz. Preliminary results from the Early Iron Age occupation in Area 9. With appendices by T. Bürge, A. Gustafsson & J. Azzopardi Book reviews Bibliographical information Opuscula. Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome (OpAthRom) 5, Stockholm 2012. ISSN: 2000-0898. ISBN: 978-91-977798-4-5. Softcover, 204 pages. https://doi.org/10.30549/opathrom-05

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